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ELLE Decoration UKELLE Decoration UK

ELLE Decoration UK August 2017

ELLE Decoration UK showcases the world’s most beautiful homes and makes good design accessible to everyone through its mix of styles, products and price points. Combining all the inspiration, information and ideas you need to bring your home to life, it is the authority on trends, style and contemporary design.

国家:
United Kingdom
语言:
English
出版商:
Hearst Magazines UK
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12 期号

本期

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summer sale 5 issues for £5*

£1 AN ISSUE* GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE Try 5 issues for JUST £5*Continue to save 33% after your introductory offerFree deliveryto your door every monthExclusive subscriber coversPlus, handpicked offers just for you TO SUBSCRIBE SECURELY ONLINE, VISIT OUR WEBSITE hearstmagazines.co.uk/ec/aug17 OR CALL 0844 322 1769 QUOTING 1EC11235. LINES OPEN MON–FRI 8AM–9.30PM, SAT 8AM–4PM Terms and conditions Offer valid for new UK subscriptions by Direct Debit only. *Your subscription will continue at £18 every six issues, unless you are notified otherwise. All orders will be acknowledged and you will be advised of the start issue within 14 days. Subscriptions may be cancelled by providing 28 days’ notice. All savings are based on the basic cover price of £4.50. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packaged with the magazine. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any…

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the big trend japonisme

In March this year, I visited the Barbican Art Gallery to see ‘The Japanese House’, an exhibition exploring Japanese domestic architecture from the end of World War II, a period that produced some incredibly influential contemporary design. It had a profound effect, from the immediate aesthetic of the homes on show (see above) to the wider stylistic sensibility that seems to surround anything to do with Japan. Of course, in the popular imagination, Japanese style is all shoji screens, tatami mats and a single Bonsai tree placed just so on a black lacquered console. No doubt there are many Japanese people with terrible hoarding habits and homes full of clutter, but when I conjure up visions of Japonisme, I picture only Zen simplicity, exquisite ceramics, delicate paintings and an extreme…

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the wal lcovering blue agate

Italian brand Antolini, known for its beautiful natural stones, excavated quarries everywhere from Madagascar to Brazil to gather slabs and shards of blue agate, which forms part of its ‘Precioustone’ collection. The sapphire-hued fine-grain quartz is loved for its layered formation that makes for beautiful cross-sections. Once the stones have been arranged, bound together with resin and polished into slabs just over three centimetres thick, you can purchase them off the peg (in either a 109x58-inch slab, or the new extra-large 124x75-inch size) and even add backlighting to make the wallcovering glow. Alternatively, have your blue agate cut to a bespoke size. While you can decide whether or not to believe in the healing and prosperity-promoting properties of these gems, it’s hard to deny the wow-factor of a wall sparkling…

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the innovation technology as art

Gone are the days of hiding your television in a cabinet. The hottest launches in the tech world are functional works of art. Spotted at the Milan furniture fair, Samsung’s Yves Béhar-designed ‘The Frame’ TV (above; samsung.com/uk/the-frame) and Bang & Olufsen’s ‘BeoSound Shape’ sound system (below, from £3,400; bang-olufsen.com) could take pride of place in any home. Swiss designer Béhar’s television turns into an ultra-modern canvas when not in use – light sensors in the frame automatically adjust the screen’s brightness so that the picture appears to be printed on paper. The effect is that the screen simply blends in with other artworks on your wall. As Béhar says, ‘once it is up, you really can’t tell it’s there’. There’s a selection of frames to suit the style of your room,…

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the colour plum

Much like the fruit from which it takes its name, the colour plum comes in many shades, from the deepest, ultra-ripe purples to paler, more delicate hues. Whichever end of the spectrum you favour for your home, plum can always be counted on to lend a room a distinguished feel. Indeed, this colour has long been associated with wealth and power. It is a close relation to Tyrian Purple, a shade loved by Roman Emperors and royalty, which was produced using a dye extracted from molluscs found only on the shores of the city of Tyre in ancient Phoenicia (now Lebanon) – so expensive was this dye that only the most prosperous could afford it. Luckily, that’s no longer the case. Now, we can all feast on the finest plum…

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the accessory ‘pr imate’ ceramics by bosa

Milan-based artist and designer Elena Salmistraro’s brightly glazed ceramic vases and plates for Bosa depict different members of the ape family. Salmistraro was fascinated by the deep connection and similarities that exist between ourselves and primates – after all, we are only a few evolutionary steps away from one another – and with this collection, she cleverly captures that essence. The six designs all feature fantastic saturated colours and metallic glazes. Exhibit them on a shelf or mantlepiece as a reminder to monkey about more – you could even add one of the designer’s decorative plates featuring one of her playful original drawings for the series. From £97 for a plate; £835 for a vase (bosatrade.com).…

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