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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Movies, TV & Music
Abbey RoadAbbey Road

Abbey Road

Abbey Road

Abbey Road has become one of The Beatles’ best-loved albums, influencing generations of musicians and producers all over the world. In this book, we celebrate the groundbreaking record and its enduring legacy. Discover the stories behind the songs, the creation of that iconic photograph and what made 1969 such a pivotal year in music and history. Abbey Road may have marked the end of the road for The Beatles, but even amid personal and professional tensions, the band carefully crafted a classic.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
welcome to abbey road 50th anniversary

On 8th August 1969, John, Paul, George and Ringo strode across the zebra crossing outside their favourite studios to create the cover image for their next album. Little did they know that five decades later fans would still flock to Abbey Road for the chance to follow in their idols’ footsteps. Abbey Road has become one of The Beatles’ best-loved albums, influencing generations of musicians and producers all over the world. In this book, we celebrate the groundbreaking record and its enduring legacy. Discover the stories behind the songs, the creation of that iconic photograph and what made 1969 such a pivotal year in music and history. Abbey Road may have marked the end of the road for The Beatles, but even amid personal and professional tensions, the band carefully…

1 min.
abbey road

Future PLC Richmond House, 33 Richmond Hill, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH2 6EZ Editorial Editor Jacqueline Snowden Designer Briony Duguid Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Contributors Charles Ginger, Henry Yates, Ian Fortnam, Jon Wells, Kate Marsh, Katy Stokes, Michael Leonard, Neil Crossley, Rob Hughes, Timothy Williamson Cover images BEATLES ABBEY ROAD album cover from October 1969 Courtesy EMI Apple © Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo Photography All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com International Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Cheif Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan…

8 min.
the definitive history

John Lennon went crazy in Hamburg. He was 19 years old, obsessed with rock ’n’ roll and high on speed. When he wasn’t fighting with members of the audience or playing guitar in his underpants with a toilet seat round his neck, he would antagonise the club’s German patrons with Nazi salutes. Once he even urinated from a window onto some passing nuns… just for laughs. Lennon was playing eight hours a night, seven days a week with his band, The Beatles. Little did the young men know that within a few years they would be the biggest group in the world. But for the moment, they were just going off their heads and having a blast. The sound of The Beatles in Hamburg is best described as raw power. Little amps…

2 min.
the fab four… beatles gigs!

The Cavern Club, Liverpool 3rd August 1963 John Lennon first played Liverpool’s Cavern Club with his band The Quarrymen in 1957. The then jazz-only club had a strictly no rock ’n’ roll policy that Lennon promptly ignored, belting out Elvis Presley’s Don’t Be Cruel. This did not go down well with the club’s management or punters. The Beatles played their first show at the Cavern Club at lunchtime on 21st February 1961, having recently returned from Hamburg. They would eventually put in 292 appearances at the little club in Matthew Street. Their farewell show for the home crowd on 3rd August 1963 came just a few months before they conquered America. The atmosphere in there must have been electric. Shea Stadium, New York, 15th August 1965 The Beatles played Shea Stadium on their…

2 min.
the fab four… beatles riffs!

I Want To Hold Your Hand (Past Masters – Volume One) I Want To Hold Your Hand kicked the door open to America for The Beatles. The song’s intro riff is a simple but thrilling slice of rock ’n’ roll. Add to it the hand claps, harmony vocals on the chorus and George’s cool little guitar licks, and it’s no wonder the US teens went mad for it. John played his Hamburg-era Rickenbacker 325 while George plucked his big Gretsch 6122 Country Gentleman. And – as with all the early Beatles records – Paul used his Höfner 500/1 violin bass. For laughs, check out The Beatles singing the song in German on the Past Masters – Volume One compilation. Das Beatles rock, ja! Day Tripper (Past Masters – Volume Two) “That’s mine,” said Lennon. “The…

2 min.
the fab four… beatles guitar solos!

Nowhere Man (Rubber Soul, 1965) One of Lennon’s greatest songs, Nowhere Man has a distinctive guitar sound thanks to a pair of Sonic Blue Fender Stratocasters. John recorded the rhythm part on his Gibson J-160E electroacoustic before he and George played the solo in unison on their matching Fenders. The guys were still recording with their usual Vox AC30 30-watt valve amps although they had actually taken delivery of two Vox AC100 amps by this time and may have used them on the track. The Nowhere Man solo isn’t difficult to play. The hard bit is coming up with something so melodically beautiful and not being tempted to overplay it. Something (Abbey Road, 1969) Both John Lennon and Paul McCartney – who never really had any time for George Harrison’s songwriting – loved Something. While…