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Architectural Digest February 2021

Architectural Digest is the world's foremost design authority, showcasing the work of top architects and interior decorators. It continues to set new benchmarks for how to live well—what to buy, what to see and do, where to travel, and who to watch on the fast-paced, multifaceted global design scene.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
Frequency:
Monthly
₹582.76
₹2,187.36
11 Issues

in this issue

1 min
off the grid

THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX PROVENÇAL TILE BY MADE BY ANN SACKS COMES IN MANY SHAPES AND COLORS—PERFECT FOR YOUR BRIGHT IDEA. ANNSACKS.COM GROUNDWORK DIFFERENT-SIZED TILES CALL FOR SPECIFIC TROWELS. QEP MAKES ONES WITH JUST THE NOTCHES YOU’LL NEED. HOMEDEPOT.COM CENTER YOURSELF WHEN LAYING A TILE FLOOR, ALWAYS WORK FROM THE MIDDLE OF THE ROOM OUT, LEAVING A 1/4" GAP ALONG THE WALLS FOR EXPANSION. IT’S ALL ON THE LINE REMEMBER: GREAT TILEWORK COMES DOWN TO THE GROUT. PICK A CONTRASTING TONE THAT ACCENTUATES YOUR OVERALL PALETTE. FOR MORE SMART IDEAS VISIT @GETCLEVER ON INSTAGRAM OR ARCHDIGEST.COM/CLEVER INTERIORS: ISABEL PARRA; STYLING, DORCIA KELLY; PAINTING AND LAMPS, JORGE PARDO. ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES.…

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2 min
editor’s letter

“How does one heal a city? How does one maintain ‘homeostasis’ in a house, a family, or a community?”—Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee New York City has long proved a fertile stomping ground for AD. The magazine has devoted scores of pages and sometimes entire issues to the Big Apple, documenting the grand and the gritty, the traditional and the unconventional: penthouses, town houses, industrial lofts, elegant apartments, and unrenovated artists’ studios alike. Each of these quintessentially urban spaces is ultimately a backdrop for the main attraction—New Yorkers themselves, the denizens of that great melting pot of talented, idiosyncratic humanity. In the wake of a pandemic that has dealt a particularly brutal blow to our beloved city, the editors agreed that visits to some committed locals in their exceptional habitats might provide a…

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2 min
seeing stripes

When Gino Circiello, Guy Avventuriero, and Emilio Torre opened Gino of Capri, an Italian restaurant on New York City’s Lexington Avenue, in 1945, Circiello asked his friend Valentino Crescenzi to design something dashing for the walls. The results: 314 leaping zebras set against spaghetti-sauce red. “I chose it because I love to hunt,” Circiello later told The New York Times about the pattern, which was also punctuated by teeny, tiny flying arrows. “And it is something that people will remember.” It worked. The zebras became the restaurant’s hallmark until a fire ravaged the place in 1973. Gino’s wasn’t Gino’s without the zebras, so Circiello turned to artist and designer Flora Scalamandré, cofounder with husband Franco of their namesake fabric-and-wallpaper company. She fastidiously redrew the zebras and cut new screens, creating a…

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3 min
all in a day’s work

Life before the pandemic sure was hectic, wasn’t it? My schedule was packed and our office was bursting, with 20 people, including six full-time interior designers. It was a battle to just contain everyone’s stuff. But we had a lot of fun—brainstorming new designs or celebrating whenever somebody got their architecture license. And then on March 15, as the city shut down, we gathered around the conference table and I told everyone to take their workstation home. We have yet to all reunite in one room. (Though we did meet for a late-summer picnic in Prospect Park.) Home is where my practice started. For many years, the business operated out of the fourth floor of my Clinton Hill town house, where my son would run around naked after baths and the…

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1 min
overnight sensations

SIX SENSES NEW YORK THE BRAND WILL CUT THE RIBBON ON ITS FIRST NORTH AMERICAN PROPERTY—AT THE XI, A PAIR OF TOWERS BY AD100 ARCHITECT BJARKE INGELS THAT OVERLOOK THE CHELSEA WATERFRONT. SIXSENSES.COM ACE HOTEL BROOKLYN ATELIER ACE AND AD100 FIRM ROMAN AND WILLIAMS HAVE LENT THEIR MIDAS TOUCHES TO ACE’S SOON-TO-OPEN BROOKLYN DEBUT, MIXING EXPOSED CONCRETE, RUGGED TIMBER, AND ECLECTIC FURNISHINGS TO SET THE MOOD. ACEHOTEL.COM AMAN NEW YORK AMAN JUNKIES WILL BE ABLE TO GET THEIR FIX AT THE CROWN BUILDING, A 1921 FIFTH AVENUE ICON (A.K.A. MOMA’S ORIGINAL HOME) WHERE GILDEDAGE GLAMOUR WILL INFUSE 83 GUEST ROOMS, A SPA, AND MORE. AMAN.COM ROBERTS: KYLE KNODELL. SIX SENSES: DBOX. ACE: STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON. AMAN: COURTESY OF AMAN NEW YORK.…

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1 min
local legend

There are few things more synonymous with New York City than the Tiffany & Co. flagship: the American jeweler’s iconic Cross & Cross–designed home at the corner of 57th Street and Fifth Avenue, where it has resided since 1940. Lesser known, however, is the fact that the building’s eight-foot-tall statue of the Greek mythological figure Atlas—shouldering the clock that graces its west façade—predates the location by nearly 100 years. Commissioned by Charles Lewis Tiffany from Henry Frederick Metzler, an artisan friend who crafted ship figureheads, the wooden statue (painted to resemble bronze) was initially mounted above the entrance to Tiffany’s third store, at 550 Broadway, and traveled flagship to flagship thereafter. While we don’t anticipate his making moves anytime soon—OMA, the architecture firm cofounded by Rem Koolhaas, is currently undertaking…

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