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Bike Australia

Bike Australia Issue #14

BIKE Australia is an exciting magazine for the enthusiast as it covers the depth and breadth of cycling. It provides readers with tips on technique, nutrition, fitness, feature stories and reviews on the latest cycling products.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Nextmedia Pty Ltd
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In this issue

2 min.
watch, learn, do

FOUR YEARS AGO I received The Letter. It was from the London Olympic Organising Committee informing me that my application for a press pass had been successful. Enclosed was an all-access pass to every Olympic venue, a natty purple lanyard and – the cherry on the cake – an all-expenses-paid Oyster card for the London Underground. I almost wept as I sifted through the treasures in that envelope. And what does any self-respecting sports writer do when booking summer flights to London? He gives himself a week’s breathing space so he can catch the bullet train to Paris and watch the last few days of the Tour, of course. And so it was that I got to stand in the shadow of Chartres Cathedral and watch the rictus of agony on…

1 min.
three great tips from this issue

TAKE IT INSIDE (p19) No matter how much you revel in discomfort, some winter mornings are altogether too bleak to even contemplate opening the front door. A smart move: hop on a set of rollers and crank out the kays in your loungeroom. Here’s how to do it. COFFEE, ANYONE? (p20) Sure, you’re probably already aware that a pre-ride coffee makes cycling a hell of a lot easier. But are you getting the most out of this performance-enhancing (and entirely legal) wonder drug? Here’s your guide to dosing up properly. SCIENCE OF SLEEP (p38) For many cyclists, the dreaded sound of the alarm clock is a necessary precursor to any ride. But are your pre-dawn starts sabotaging your form and fitness on the bike? Possibly. Here’s your primer on how to maximise your sack-time.…

6 min.
the whakarewarewa forest

Situated a 10-minute drive from the centre of Rotorua, The Redwoods, as this forest is more commonly known, is one of the finest MTB parks on the planet. The area’s volcanic geology has gifted the place with both a precipitous topography and a mouldable pumice soil that allows trail builders to follow the rugged contours of the mountains, sculpting berms and rollers that set like stone in the sun and don’t wash away in the rain (crucial in a soggy part of the world that receives almost 1.5 metres of rain a year). The result is a sprawling web of premium single trail, graded from 1 (beginner) right through to 6 (downright maniacal), which cuts through the old logging forests of sequoia, pine, spruce and larch. According to my guide Karl Young,…

7 min.
ask bike

WHAT IS THE WORLD’S FASTEST VELODROME? Our pick: the Bicentenary Velodrome in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Six UCI world records have been set on its 250-metre wooden oval. Some of the credit goes to the track’s 1887-metre altitude. “High elevations result in lower air density, which decreases aerodynamic drag,” says Robby Ketchell, chief data scientist for Team Sky. Another advantage of racing at Aguascalientes: it’s indoors. “Most record attempts nowadays take place on indoor velodromes with wooden or synthetic surfaces because the environment can be controlled,” Ketchell says. Bradley Wiggins set the World Hour Record last year at London’s Lee Valley VeloPark (pictured), an indoor wooden track with heating and ventilation systems designed to facilitate record-breaking performances. Why don’t roadies wear hydration packs? We’ll excuse ourselves from any debate over aesthetics and aerodynamics. That said,…

2 min.
is recovery necessary?

Before you swaddle yourself in compression gear and guzzle protein shakes after every ride, make sure your effort warrants it. If you didn’t go hard enough to induce musclefibre damage and suck your energy stores dry, you might not need dedicated recovery, says coach Hunter Allen. But if you’ve knocked out a solid ride (see “Recover if You Rode”) you could probably benefit from some R&R. Try some of these tried-and-tested techniques. If you’ve hit it really hard, the next few hours are the optimal window for helping your body get the most from your effort, says exercise physiologist Dr Stacy Sims. The good news is you don’t have to spend the whole time recovering. Employing just a couple of these proven methods will make you feel good. Recover if You Rode… 2…

2 min.
that’s how you roll

1 GET SUPPORT Set up next to something sturdy like a door frame, workbench or table. The key is to support yourself at a height that’s roughly the same as your handlebar to stay stable when you’re grabbing or letting go. 2 GET STARTED Instead of placing your bike on the rollers first, move the bike next to them, straddle the top tube and lift the rear wheel into position. Then bring the front wheel up. Grab your bench, sit on the saddle, and start pedalling right away while still holding on. 3 GET UP TO SPEED If you pedal too slowly, it’s hard to stay upright. Find a gear in the middle of your range and try to get up to 80 rpm quickly. As you increase your cadence, gradually take…