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Bloomberg Businessweek-Asia Edition

Bloomberg Businessweek-Asia Edition December 9, 2019

Each issue of Businessweek features in-depth perspectives on the financial markets, industries, trends, technology and people guiding the economy. Draw upon Businessweek's timely incisive analysis to help you make better decisions about your career, your business, and your personal investments.

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Country:
China
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bloomberg Finance LP
Frequency:
Weekly
₹593.96
₹2,100
50 Issues

in this issue

1 min
the sandwich that broke the internet

The chain’s buttermilk fried chicken has long had a devoted following. The late Anthony Bourdain praised it in interviews. Nicki Minaj put it on her tour rider. Beyoncé has a special membership card giving her a free supply for life. Despite the adoration, for 47 years the chain had never offered the chicken between two pieces of bread. That changed in August when Popeyes tweeted that it was selling a $3.99 sandwich—fried chicken topped with pickles and either mayonnaise or spicy Cajun sauce on a brioche bun—at its 2,400 U.S. locations. The news went viral after a Twitter spat: Following t h e Po p eye s announcement, Chick-fil-A Inc. made a passive-aggressive claim that its sandwich was the “original.” Popeyes replied, “y’all good?” Popeyes had prepared for franchises to sell about…

4 min
can chanel keep time in watches?

Chanel’s watch and jewelry boutique on the Place Vendôme in Paris sits directly across from the Ritz hotel where Coco Chanel once lived. Its three arched windows displaying ceramic timepieces, floral brooches, and gold quilted-pattern rings look out on the shops of such Swiss stalwarts as Rolex, Breguet, and Patek Philippe. The French house is sending a message to its noble neighbors: The company synonymous with woven chain-link handbags, tweed blazers, and No. 5 fragrance is determined to become a bigger force in the rarefied world of fine timepieces. But pushing even one of the most coveted names in female fashion into a category still populated predominantly by men won’t be easy. Other fashion brands such as Dior and Hermès have tried to make headway in the tradition-bound industry, with limited…

6 min
is tennessee’s free college program a model for the nation?

Elizabeth Lindamood’s Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays are for Food City, the supermarket in Oak Ridge, Tenn., where she manages cashiers and baggers and assists customers. The rest of the week is for classes at a campus of Roane State Community College 2 miles away, where the 18-year-old is studying to become an elementary school teacher—plus a couple more Food City shifts. Lindamood’s tuition is paid by the state’s Tennessee Promise program, but constant pressure and late nights have made her consider quitting more than once. “There’s been quite a few times where I’ve just been sitting there with my boyfriend and I just break out in tears,” she says. “I’m just so stressed. I don’t know what to do.” Democratic presidential candidates, including Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren,…

5 min
2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 israel’s lost year

On Nov. 14, 2018, Israel’s then-Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman withdrew his small hawkish party from the parliamentary coalition led by embattled Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, plunging the government into chaos. More than a year later, that confusion has yet to abate. After two successive national elections, neither Netanyahu nor his principal rival, former military chief Benny Gantz, has been able to form a government; the latest attempt, by Gantz’s centrist Blue and White bloc, ended in failure on Nov. 20. Having interim leaders at top ministries and a prime minister in permanent campaign mode—not to mention under indictment—is placing the country in a tenuous position. Business goes on, but there’s a limit to what a caretaker government can accomplish. “It’s a dysfunctional crisis,” says Reuven Hazan, a political scientist at Hebrew University.…

1 min
don’t forget the usual suspects

William Barr, U.S. attorney general ● Jeff Bezos, CEO, Amazon .com Inc. ● Jair Bolsonaro, president of Brazil ● Sergey Brin, director, Alphabet Inc. ● Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO, Berkshire Hathaway Inc. ● Tim Cook, CEO, Apple Inc. ● Ronan Farrow, journalist ● Pope Francis ● Xi Jinping, president of the People’s Republic of China ● Boris Johnson, prime minister of the U.K. ● Kim Jong Un, supreme leader of North Korea ● Emmanuel Macron, president of France ● Narendra Modi, prime minister of India ● Elon Musk, CEO, Tesla Inc. and SpaceX ● Larry Page, director, Alphabet Inc. ● Nancy Pelosi, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives ● Mike Pompeo, U.S. secretary of state ● Vladimir Putin, president of Russia ● Mohammed bin Salman, crown prince of…

2 min
in brief

President Trump escalated U.S. trade tensions with other nations. First he slapped levies on steel and aluminum from Brazil and Argentina in retaliation for what he called currency manipulation. Then he threatened duties on wine from France in response to a French technology tax. Russia began shipping natural gas to northern China through a 1,900-mile pipeline. With Beijing trying to move away from coal, Chinese gas consumption is surging. For President Vladimir Putin, the supply contract marks a welcome pivot to the fast-growing economies of Asia as relations deteriorate with the West. With about a week until general elections in the U.K., Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn traded barbs over who’s to blame for the prison release of a convicted terrorist who went on a knife attack in central…