EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Business & Finance
Business Today

Business Today 3-May-20

A leading business magazine read by the business leaders for staying ahead and managing challenges that comes right away in the ever changing world of business.

Country:
India
Language:
English
Publisher:
Living Media India Limited
Frequency:
Biweekly
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26 Issues

in this issue

3 min.
the coronavirus economy

From here on, the world history will probably be quoted in pre-coronavirus and post-coronavirus eon stamps. For it is not just a healthcare shock to humanity. It’s an economic shock, humanitarian and livelihood shock, a consumption shock, a stock market shock, fractured supply chain shock – all rolled into one. UNCTAD believes that India and China are among the few world economies least likely to fall into recession. But don’t be surprised if it chooses to revise India outlook. World Bank already has – to the most pessimistic outlook yet – a near flat growth of 1.5 per cent for FY21. Even though India has a host of positives going for itself. First, whether it is the Modi government’s precocious, pre-emptive lockdown (now sealing), the warm weather, the universal BCG vaccination policy…

1 min.
india’s weak financial frontier

FOREX RESERVES DIP $12 BN Foreign investors panicked and withdrew money in week ended March 20. Gold reserves fell $1.6 billion to $27.9 billion ($ billion) FOREIGN EXCHANGE RESERVES FOREIGN CURRENCY ASSETS GOLD SPECIAL DRAWING RIGHTS RUPEE LOSES The rupee weakened against the dollar as more cases of coronavirus were reported EXPORTS REFUSE TO PICK UP… Three of the top five exports in terms of value saw negative growth in the April-February period INDIA’S MAJOR EXPORTS ($ BN): APRIL-FEBRUARY …THOUGH IMPORTS TOO CRASH Imports fell at a higher rate of 7.3 per cent; this was due to lower crude oil prices towards the end of the period and decline in domestic demand INDIA’S MAJOR IMPORTS ($ BN): APRIL-FEBRUARY $10.3bn Fall in foreign currency assets, a major component of the overall reserves $297bn India’s total exports (April 2019-February 2020), down 1.5 per cent from FY19. The country’s imports were…

3 min.
man of action

Q What keeps you going? What makes you wake up every morning thinking about helping others? Trust me, it gives me immense satisfaction when I extend a helping hand to the needy. I believe one should find a little time to help make life better for one’s fellow citizens. That’s why we’re called human beings. It’s in my DNA to serve society in whatever way possible. My grandfather, the late Chiranjilal Murarka, was a well-known philanthropist of his times and, then, my father, Kashi Murarka, who now continues to do a lot in terms of public service and social betterment. I have long learned that live life as if there is no tomorrow, end of our journey on Earth is inevitable, why not do what’s best possible for others.” Q What is…

5 min.
hitting the panic button

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to disrupt the economy, companies across the board are facing the heat. The CEO of a large consumer products company says though some of his production lines are operating – producing sanitisers, soaps – nearly 70 per cent of the business has stopped completely. “It’s a question of survival more than future investment. We are partially shielded because of the nature of our business, but activities in infrastructure, construction, transportation and entertainment sectors have come to a halt. Supply-side issues are affecting businesses that are still operating. We don’t expect things to normalise in the next three-six months,” he says. Most of his views are echoed in the latest Business Confidence Index (BCI) survey for the January-March period. A total of 67 per cent respondents don’t…

17 min.
jumpstarting post-coronavirus economy

The only way to control the raging global coronavirus pandemic, the biggest health crisis of our times, is to switch off the global economic engines through a complete lockdown and social isolation. The resultant economic pandemonium, though, is the last thing that governments want – or can afford. The dilemma leaves nations performing a balancing act, of finding answers to a very complex problem that needs health, social and economic solutions, all at the same time. Business Today brings together five renowned names in macroeconomics, public administration and public finance for their views on how to re-start India’s post-lockdown economy when restrictions are lifted, even as the country continues to fight the disease outbreak. Here are their prescriptions. “GIVE CREDIT, WORKING CAPITAL, EXPORT SOPS, FISCAL INCENTIVES. NOT SEQUENTIALLY, BUT SIMULTANEOUSLY”The minimum amount…

8 min.
falling short

The central government’s response to the economic fallout of coronavirus has been a mix of a few procedural and compliance relaxations, liquidity injection in the banking sector through the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and a small package aimed at the poor and underprivileged. In short, it has been tepid and cautious. With several agencies predicting doom and gloom for the economy — the latest is World Bank forecast of 1.5-2.8 per cent FY21 real GDP growth versus 6 per cent previously — the government’s response to the situation has baffled many. The size of the package for the poor and underprivileged — ₹1.7 lakh crore — is less than 1 per cent of GDP, even when a large number of economists and experts are asking for a package that’s 4-5…