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Forbes Africa

Forbes Africa June - July 2021

Forbes Africa is the drama critic to business in Africa. The magazine helps readers connect the dots, form patterns and see beyond the obvious, giving them a completely different perspective. In doing this, it delivers sharp, in-depth and engaging stories by looking at global and domestic issues from an African prism.

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Country:
South Africa
Language:
English
Publisher:
ABN Publishing Pty Ltd (trading as Forbes Africa)
Frequency:
Bimonthly
₹207.79
₹1,718.60
6 Issues

in this issue

1 min
a trip to the moon next year?

South African-born tech billionaire Elon Musk’s SpaceX is planning to launch a mission to the moon in the first quarter of next year. According to Forbes, this mission, known as DOGE-1, is being entirely paid for with the cryptocurrency Dogecoin. In a press brief released on May 9, the mission in 2022 will commence from Canada’s Geometric Energy Corporation (GEC) and will see a 40-kilogram CubeSat launch on a rideshare Falcon 9 rocket to the moon. “Having officially transacted with Doge for a deal of this magnitude, Geometric Energy Corporation and SpaceX have solidified Doge as a unit of account for lunar business in the space sector,” Geometric Energy's Chief Executive Officer Samuel Reid said, according to Forbes.…

1 min
wiphold’s louisa mojela on turning obstacles into opportunities

One of South Africa's most accomplished leaders in business, Louisa Mojela, the Group CEO and co-founder of Wiphold, was recently awarded a doctorate degree by the faculty of economic and management sciences at Stellenbosch University in Cape Town for her leadership in establishing platforms to empower women in Africa. Wiphold, or the Women Investment Portfolio Holdings, is one of South Africa’s best-known first generation empowerment companies owned and led by women. Founded just weeks before a free South Africa was emerging from the dark shadows of the apartheid in 1994, it gave financial power to grassroots black South African women, driving broad-based economic empowerment, and among other milestones, it also became the first women-only empowerment company to list on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange in 1999. In an interview with FORBES AFRICA, Mojela shared…

3 min
creating a renewable and sustainable lifestyle the novarick way

In that famous line from the 1967 film “The Graduate,” an older man gives Benjamin Braddock that one word of advice. Now, the economic future belongs to “sustainable” because of consumer demand driven by an overwhelming desire to do right by society, economy and the environment. This underscores a need for new models of housing, as the older ones will not hold their value by today’s Renewable Energy Standard. Meaning the next generation of home buyers, who are mostly urban with trendy lifestyles, will be quickly drawn to a more energy efficient model of living. Considering the post-pandemic effect, many young and future buyers will want and are attracted to houses with smart functional spaces fit for work-from-home lifestyle, a central bar area and coffee nook, large windows for ample light, energy…

9 min
the other ‘c’that has dominated news from last year

EVEN AT THE HEIGHT OF THE GREATEST lockdown in human history, there was one industry that did not break a sweat. One that did not buckle even a little under the crushing economic downturn. The cryptocurrency industry. With assets like Bitcoin sitting at a price per coin just shy of $6,000 and Ether sitting at a price per coin shy of $130 at the start of April 2020. With Bitcoin being the market leader and Ether being the most widely-used crypto, both assets showed unbelievable growth over the year. Bitcoin broke the $64,000 mark and Ether broke the $2,400 mark. In May, hardly a month later, illustrating the volatility inherent in cryptos, Bitcoin plummeted to just over $40,000, while Ether gained somewhat to $2,700. A lot of Bitcoin’s recent volatility has had…

7 min
daddy cool

SOUTH AFRICAN MEN ARE MAKING HISTORY, choosing to become single fathers by choice. In March, Wesley Hayes, a 35-year-old divorce attorney won a year-long battle to legally register his daughter, Justine Filly – her second name reflects Hayes’ love of horses. Andrew Martin, a fertility lawyer who heads his own firm in Cape Town, has successfully registered a number of babies for single fathers through surrogacy over the past decade. One of Martin’s clients is a 46-year-old Johannesburg business consultant, Gavin Phillips*. Since November 2019, Phillips has undergone three unsuccessful IVF journeys and is now about to begin his fourth. “I’ve always wanted children and after I lost my father to Alzheimer’s in 2017, the need to extend my family, and have a legacy, became more intense,” he says. Phillips was married and unfortunately…

6 min
lessons from india’s covid carnage and need for preemptive action

WE ALL BECOME PHILOSOPHICAL at some point in our lives; every time we go through a crisis, some aspect of philosophy becomes my default setting. I look at purpose, reason, truth and all the fine things that are the critical ingredients of our lives. Introspection leads to finding reason for all the blunders that could have been overridden by common sense. Every time disaster has struck, we know that there was something we could have done to prevent it. The logic of it all is so elementary, but in reality, we know that common sense is not so common. Although Mel Brooks was belittled as a ‘stand-up philosopher’ in the 1981 film History of the World, Part 1 and called a ‘bullshit artist’, I do believe there is merit in…