India Today August 16, 2021

India Today is the leading news magazine and most widely read publication in India. The magazine’s leadership is unquestioned, so much so that India Today is what Indian journalism is judged by, for its integrity and ability to bring unbiased and incisive perspective to arguably the most dynamic, yet perplexing, region in the world. Breaking news and shaping opinion, it is now a household name and the flagship brand of India’s leading multidimensional media group. Additionally, the weekly brings with it a range supplements like Women, Home, Aspire, Spice and Simply which focus on style, health, education, fashion, etc. and Indian cities.

Country:
India
Language:
English
Publisher:
Living Media India Limited
Frequency:
Weekly
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52 Issues

in this issue

5 min
from the editor-in-chief

During every Olympics, the country goes through the usual hand-wringing over why the Indian contingent doesn’t perform to its potential. The Tokyo Olympics this year are no different. Team India’s overall showing has been dismal. On August 5, India languished at the 62nd spot out of 85 medal-winning countries, behind even tiny Qatar and Kosovo, which won two golds each. Many of our athletes failed to live up to their promise. The collapse of the Indian shooting team is a case in point. Two of India’s most decorated boxers were ousted in the first round. Remarkable. Before getting to the Olympics, Indian athletes have to jump multiple hoops—abysmal sporting infrastructure, politicised sporting bodies and insensitive officials. There are deeper issues at play once our sportspersons reach the world’s ultimate sporting arena.…

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6 min
porn and prejudice

Last month, the police made a celebrity arrest for porn trafficking. The accused, Raj Kundra, countered that the material he had been circulating was erotic, not pornographic. Since we are not privy to the particularities of the disputed material, the point is moot, but it’s a reminder that the law is not sensitive to the distinction between pornography and erotica. Section 67A of the Information Technology Act, the law invoked in the Kundra case, prohibits the circulation of “explicit material”, legal language that makes no distinction between purchasing a sexually explicit home video to watch with your consenting partner and acquiring a sexually violent video to watch as a prelude to a gang-bang. While the law against circulating pornographic material may be protective in its intention, in its effect, it infantilises the…

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1 min
jab we met

The animosity between former allies Maharashtra chief minister Uddhav Thackeray and opposition leader Devendra Fadnavis is well known. But things, it seems, are changing. On the morning of July 30, their paths crossed during an inspection of flood-hit areas in Kolhapur. The meeting was brief but convivial and, as it later emerged, scripted. Thackeray’s personal assistant Milind Narvekar had coordinated the meeting with Fadnavis’s team. The parties seem to be softening their stance towards each other, too. Later on the same day, a BJP leader, requesting anonymity, told some reporters in Mumbai that senior party leaders from Delhi had asked him to refrain from making personal allegations against Sena leaders. Is the Sena-BJP alliance back on track?…

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1 min
modi vs the ias?

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s address to IPS probationers on July 31 has triggered a flurry of activity among Madhya Pradesh’s IPS officers. The PM said that most cities with a population of over a million are heading towards a police commissionerate system and the ones that haven’t yet will hopefully follow suit. MP does not have this system, mainly because of resistance from the IAS lobby. But even as the police circulates clips of the PM’s speech hoping CM Shivraj Singh Chouhan pays heed, the question remains—will the powerful IAS lobby stand for it?…

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1 min
didi’s game face

Mamata Banerjee’s recent whirlwind tour of Delhi made it clear that the West Bengal chief minister wants to play at the national level. Her ‘Khela hobe’ (Game on) election slogan, inspired by the rap number written by a young Trinamool Congress worker, is being adopted by other parties too. Akhilesh Yadav’s SP wants to adopt a modified version—‘Khela Hoi’—as it prepares for the 2022 Uttar Pradesh assembly poll. Mamata has also requested lyricist Javed Akhtar to help translate the song into Hindi for a pan-India appeal.…

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5 min
counting the castes

When the Union minister of state for home Nityanand Rai said in the Lok Sabha on July 20 that the Centre had decided against a caste-wise enumeration of the country’s population in the census—other than of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes—many saw it as an attempt by the BJP to avoid stirring up the caste cauldron in the run-up to the Uttar Pradesh assembly election due early next year. The first BJP ally to red-flag the Centre’s move was Bihar chief minister Nitish Kumar. Nitish, on July 24, urged the Centre to reconsider its stand. “We believe there should be a caste-based census. The Bihar legislature had unanimously passed a resolution to this effect on February 17, 2019, and again on February 27, 2020, and sent it to the central government.…

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