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Reader's Digest India

Reader's Digest India July 2018

Reader’s Digest has been the world’s biggest-selling magazine for nearly nine decades. It is also India’s largest-selling magazine in English. Beneath the fun and excitement of its pages, the Digest is, above all else, a serious magazine that never loses sight of the fact that, each day, all of us confront a tough, challenging world. To the millions who read the Digest, it is not a luxury—it is a necessity. Deep within its widely varied package of humour, real-life dramas and helpful information, there is in every issue of the Digest a subtle power that guides people in every aspect of their lives.

Country:
India
Language:
English
Publisher:
Living Media India Limited
Frequency:
Monthly
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12 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
a lot more than just cement

We are about a lot more. We are about laughter, Togetherness, Family, Endless possibilities… We are about a new world Bonded by the power of homes. The power to build a world of endless possibilities, to help build a stronger nation. At ACC, that’s what we have under our roof. For decades, we have kept research and innovation at the heart of all our products and services. We have taken seeds of ideas and nurtured them till they have flourished. Never resting on our laurels, we have constantly changed with the times and updated our wide range of quality construction products that best suit your changing needs. Our latest introductions are the all-new Gold and Silver range of cements, engineered with cutting-edge technology and years of exhaustive research. Construction is about a lot more than just cement. It…

2 min.
anybody out there?

THERE IS A POWER CUT IN OUR neighbourhood. My husband and I are lying on the terrace of our newly set up Delhi home. We are young, hard up and impractical—there isn’t an inverter amongst our jointly acquired belongings. We stare at the open sky above us. Memories from childhood fly about. It’s Calcutta of the 70s and the power is out. I am on the terrace with my brother looking up at the stars. He is telling me about our galaxy. That there could be another universe, where another set of brother and sister may be looking up at the sky and wondering if they could ever meet us. Dada wants to experience space travel, he says. I grab his arms. I have a hollow feeling in my stomach looking…

1 min.
humour in uniform

MY GRANDDAUGHTER’S husband was complaining about how spellcheck changes the meaning of emails when an Air Force officer told him this story: He’d sent a message to 300 of his personnel addressed to “Dear Sirs and Ma’ams”. It was received as “Dear Sirs and Mamas”. PHYLLIS HOWARD AS MY SUPERVISOR and I left the headquarters building, the lawn sprinklers, which had been showering the walkway, stopped. Realizing that he had forgotten something, my supervisor went back inside, and I followed. The sprinklers started again. “There must be a motion sensor controlling the spray,” we said, and decided to test it by walking in and out the front door. After several laps, I began looking around for the sensor. By the side of the building, instead of a sensor, I saw a very…

3 min.
over to you

WRITE & WIN! A SWEDISH SUNSET How apt was the May cover story ‘Choose Happiness Every Time’! “Happiness is a Swedish sunset,” said Mark Twain once. “It is there for all, but most of us look the other way and lose it.” The Shrimad Bhagavad Gita mentions three types of happiness—“that which springs from a clear understanding of the self; that which arises from the contact of the senses and their objects; and that which deludes the soul, arising from sleep, sloth and negligence”. Dr S. Radhakrishnan also pointed out: “Happiness lies not in the possession of outward things, but in the fulfilment of the higher mind and spirit and in the development of what is most inward in us.” KELATH GOPAKUMAR MENON, Thrissur IMPROPER OR CRIMINAL? In ‘The Case of the Driver and the…

1 min.
see the world   differently

A two-kilometre-long collection of unique architectural masterpieces, the Ellora Caves were built between 600 and 1000 CE. The caves include 34 spectacular structures, the most impressive of which is known as the The Kailash (pictured). One of India’s largest stone temples, this magnificent edifice was carved out of a single piece of bedrock by removing an amazing 2,00,000 tons of earth and stone with mere hammers and chisels. Located at Ellora in the western state of Maharashtra, this freestanding, multi-storey megalith is around 164 feet long, 108 feet wide and 100 feet high and stands as an eloquent testimony to the artistic mastery as well as technological prowess of its ancient creators.…

4 min.
a cut above

“I KNOW I CANNOT change a person or the choices they make. However, having the capacity to make a difference in the life of not one, but many, is something I aspire to,” says 19-year-old Amatullah Vahanwala. Evidently, she walks the talk. She and Niharika Jadeja started Hair for Happiness, a hair donation drive. The proceeds of the campaign go to the Little Princess Trust, a British non-profit that helps create wigs for children suffering from hair loss due to cancer treatments and other illnesses. It all began in November 2015, when Amatullah and Niharika, class XI students of Bengaluru’s Candor International School, were discussing their community service project. Niharika told Amatullah about her first hair donation experience at the age of nine and that she was eager to do it…