EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Luxury
Town & Country

Town & Country

October 2020

Town & Country features the latest in luxury, from beautiful homes, sumptuous dining to exotic locations. In 11 gorgeous annual issues, Town & Country covers the arts, fashion and culture, bringing the best of everything to America's trendsetters

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst
Frequency:
Monthly
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10 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
t&c history

1994 WELCOME HOME Architect Paul Revere Williams was “synonymous with gracious living in Hollywood’s Golden Age,” Pilar Viladas wrote in T&C’s January 1994 issue. Williams’s houses, like Jay Paley’s Bel Air residence (seen here), were—and still are—highly coveted, and his public buildings, including his renovation of the Beverly Hills Hotel, are icons. But Williams wasn’t just one of the most prominent architects of the mid–20th century, he was Black; he had to overcome immense prejudice to achieve recognition. Today his granddaughter Karen E. Hudson continues his legacy, and this year she shared his archives (which had been thought destroyed) with USC and the Getty Research Institute, which will digitize them for exhibitions and research.…

2 min.
seeing old friends again

Hutton Wilkinson’s directions to Dawnridge always start at the Beverly Hills Hotel. “THEN TAKE A SHARP RIGHT,” begin the emailed instructions—always in all caps. I have made that drive, from the hotel they call the Pink Palace (restored to iconhood by architect Paul Revere Williams) to Dawnridge, the wild fantasy of a home conjured by the late decorator (and Wilkinson’s longtime business partner) Tony Duquette, almost every time I have visited Los Angeles in the last 20 years. But it has been a while since I’ve been able to visit this city, which I love and which has been through so much. If I could go, I likely would have taken that sharp right up into the hills, so I could be at our cover shoot. You’ll see why so many…

1 min.
a call to action

The impact of the coronavirus pandemic has been felt by all, but most acutely by society’s most vulnerable. To help the millions experiencing food insecurity due to Covid-19, Hearst Magazines is partnering with Feeding America, the nation’s largest hunger relief organization. Donate at FEEDINGAMERICA.ORG. © J. PAUL GETTY TRUST/GETTY RESEARCH INSTITUTE LOS ANGELES/2004.R.10 (BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL); ALLAN GRANT/LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES (WILLIAMS); SANTE D’ORAZIO (STONE AND DUQUETTE, T&C COVER); ARTURO OLMOS (FOOD BANK); GETTY IMAGES (PAGES)…

1 min.
a note to jackie

WHAT’S #VERYTANDC HERE? The history: It’s a watch inspired by a historical moment: Louis Cartier modeled it on the tanks that fought in WWI. But it’s also timeless, and it continues to be sold and collected around the world. The fans: This particular Cartier Tank was given to Jacqueline Kennedy by her brother-in-law Stanislas Radziwill to mark his completion of a challenge issued by JFK: to walk 50 miles as part of a national health initiative. How long did it take Stas to do it? See the inscription on the back: “Stas to Jackie 23 Feb. 63, 2:05 AM to 9:35 PM” The news: The watch was sold at Christie’s for $379,500 in 2017; the buyer was rumored to be Kim Kardashian West. Cartier has it now, and they will say only that…

4 min.
pariah photobombs

There was once a time in New York City when Ghislaine Maxwell was a bona fide, Olympic-level social marathoner. “Ghislaine was at literally every lit candle in New York City and the Hamptons, both public and private. If there was a red velvet rope she was there,” says publicist R. Couri Hay, who ran into Maxwell at events for more than a decade. “She was at art openings, movie screenings, book parties at the Four Seasons,” a former friend says. “In the 2000s, you couldn’t go out at night without bumping into her.” And photographers were there to capture all of it. Party chronicler Patrick McMullan snapped more than 400 pictures of Maxwell between 1995 and 2016. There are images of her with Prince Andrew at Ascot, and next to Naomi…

5 min.
panic in the c-suite

Getting summoned to the boss’s office is always nerve-racking, but especially when the boss is Vladimir Putin. Spare a thought, then, for the poor suckers who have had to call on the Russian leader in the past few months. Visitors to his bunker in the Kremlin, as well as to his residential compound outside Moscow, have not only had to worry about being shipped off to a gulag at the drop of a trapper hat, they are also required to pass through a disinfectant tunnel in which they are sprayed with an antiseptic mist and blasted with ultraviolet rays. The contents of the spray are anyone’s guess, but given that the tunnel’s manufacturer is a small-town concern specializing in cleaning solutions for mechanical equipment, chances are it’s not vodka. Or anything…