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Outdoor LifeOutdoor Life

Outdoor Life Spring 2018

Our readers' hands-on spirit is reflected in the magazine's comprehensive gear tests and personal adventure stories. Whether shopping for a new rifle, searching for the hottest fishing holes this weekend or thirsting for exciting adventure tales, Outdoor Life is the ultimate resource.

Paese:
United States
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Bonnier Corporation
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COMPRA NUMERO
3,72 €(VAT inclusa)
ABBONATI
11,20 €(VAT inclusa)
9 Numeri

IN QUESTO NUMERO

access_time1 minuti
waypoint

Lower Blue River, CO / May 17 / 2:37 p.m. The paradox of a fishing guide’s life is this: You become a guide for the love of fishing, but you don’t get to fish as often as you’d like. Your job is to help others fish. This is true of Colorado guides Matt West and John Muir, who spend their days off back on the river. Here, West tries to control a flopping rainbow as Muir readies the net as backup. “That’s one of the bigger fish Matt has caught in Colorado,” photographer Matt Shaw says. “That’s the fish you float that section for.” LETTERS@OUTDOORLIFE.COM…

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letters

BIRDS OF A FEATHER ▸ I enjoyed OL’s Feb./Mar. cover feature, “How to Make a Hunter,” specifically the article “Late to the Game.” As a 43-year-old, I, too, have benefited from a hunter’s need to pass on his love of hunting. I had big plans to learn, but as time went on, I found myself juggling two jobs and three daughters. Similar to the author’s experience with Andrew McKean, my good friend Jim has been a gracious mentor, teaching me about deer hunting. He introduced me to local hunters, brought me to his rod and gun club, and taught me to dress and butcher deer. We enjoy swapping stories and scouting together, and I feel a greater connection to my land and a deeper appreciation for my friend. I’m hooked. Thanks…

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the big story

In the nearly seven years that I’ve been editorial director of Outdoor Life, the most consistent demand from our large audience has been for more: more cutting-edge information on hunting and fishing, more in-depth product reviews, and, most of all, more stories. The most common request we get from readers of this magazine is that you want to read long articles that take you into the field, bring you along on adventures, and explore all aspects of what makes hunting and fishing such a rich, rewarding experience. This endless hunger for more content is now being fed by many different types of media. Like the rest of society, sportsmen and women have a torrent of words, videos, and images coming at us through print magazines, books, news apps, and websites, plus Facebook…

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a man and his gun

Since its introduction in 1936, the Winchester Model 70 featured heavily in Jack O’Connor’s columns. O’Connor reflected on the origins of his relationship with it, writing in 1964: “My experience with the Model 70 actually goes back to the fall of 1925 when I bought my first Winchester Model 54 in .270 caliber. The Model 54 was really sort of a primitive Model 70, or the Model 70 is a refined Model 54.” Here’s a look at his writings on a rifle that found its way into his heart—and on his hunts—many times over. JANUARY 1940 GETTING THE RANGE The stock on the Model 70 Winchester—successor to the old Model 54—has good fore-ends, satisfactory drop at comb and butt, and a good, wide, flat butt plate. It’s not perfect, in my opinion, but any…

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selfie-defense

STORYTIME We publish true adventures. Only those used will be acknowledged. Send to THTM@OutdoorLife.com (preferred), or Outdoor Life, THTM, 2 Park Avenue Flr 9, New York, NY 10016. Include a daytime phone number. IF WE USE YOUR STORY, WE’LL SEND YOU THIS BOOK! ”THIS HAPPENED TO ME” HAS BEEN A FIXTURE OF OUTDOOR LIFE SINCE IT FIRST APPEARED IN 1940. WE’VE SINCE COMPILED SOME OF THE MOST HARROWING, HAIR-RAISING MISADVENTURES READERS HAVE EVER EXPERIENCED IN A SINGLE VOLUME. IF WE RUN YOUR STORY, YOU CAN PORE OVER THE 183 PAGES OF THIS ACTION-PACKED BOOK KNOWING YOU’RE IN GOOD COMPANY. WANT TO BUY A COPY INSTEAD? THEY’RE AVAILABLE AT OUTDOORLIFE.COM/THTMBOOK…

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go old school

HUNTING@OUTDOORLIFE.COM The tool of choice for most bowhunters is a modern marvel. It’s highly engineered, supremely efficient, and forged from aluminum, carbon, steel, and computer-aided algorithms. And then there are the rest of us: bowhunters who use a tool that is simple and enduring. It’s built of wood and fiberglass by the human hand, and though it’s comparatively limited in range and efficiency, it’s absolutely deadly when mastered. A few aspects of traditional bow design have been influenced by modern technology. But for the most part, it has remained largely unchanged since the days of Ishi, Fred Bear, and Howard Hill. And the stickbow is riding a newfound wave of popularity as more bowhunters look to change up their experience in the woods. Thinking about making the plunge into a simpler side of bowhunting?…

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