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Raspberry Pi Annual

Raspberry Pi Annual

Vol 4

The Raspberry Pi was first created in 2012, with the intention of making digital creation accessible to all. Since then, more than 14 million units have been sold to adults and children alike. Pis of different kinds are used in classrooms, libraries, research laboratories, and of course, hackerspaces all over the world. Builders, coders and hackers are using this amazing device to create everything from doomsday switches to fruit ripening detectors. In this new Raspberry Pi Annual, we’ll bring you all the basics with step-by-step tutorials in setting up your Pi and advice from Pi pros. We’ll also show you the secrets of Pi interfacing, how to create a virtual reality setup, some exciting Python projects – and much more.

Paese:
United Kingdom
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequenza:
One-off
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7,90 €

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1 minuti
welcome to raspberry pi annual

The Raspberry Pi was first created in 2012, with the intention of making digital creation accessible to all. Since then, more than 14 million units have been sold to adults and children alike. Pis of different kinds are used in classrooms, libraries, research laboratories, and of course, hackerspaces all over the world. Builders, coders and hackers are using this amazing device to create everything from doomsday switches to fruit ripening detectors. In this new Raspberry Pi Annual, we’ll bring you all the basics with step-by-step tutorials in setting up your Pi and advice from Pi pros. We’ll also show you the secrets of Pi interfacing, how to create a virtual reality setup, some exciting Python projects – and much more. Welcome to the Raspberry Pi revolution!…

1 minuti
secrets of pi interfacing

Using a single-board computer such as a Raspberry Pi to control real-world devices requires two quite different skills. First, you need to be able to churn out code, and second, you need to be able to interface the Pi to external devices. Here we look at the second of those areas and, in particular, investigate how to go beyond using off-the-shelf interfaces like HATs, or even building circuits that others have designed, by designing your own electronic circuits. Using this hands-on guide, you’ll soon be able to connect switches, LEDs and so much more. Our main emphasis is interfacing to the Raspberry Pi, but most of this can also be applied to other small computers as the Arduino, which are also popular for control applications. Learn how to design simple electronic circuits…

3 minuti
understand the pi’s gpio hardware

Even if you’ve never connected external devices to your Raspberry Pi, you can’t fail to have noticed the double row of 40 pins at the edge of the board (26 pins on the early Pis). This is the GPIO header, otherwise known as the general-purpose input/ output connector, and it provides a means of interfacing to real-world devices. Before starting to think about designing circuits to interface to the Pi, therefore, it’s important to understand the basics of the GPIO hardware. POWER AND GROUND PINS Although referred to as the GPIO header, not all the pins connect to the GPIO hardware. Some of the other pins provide power and ground connections that are also used by hardware that’s connected to the header. The Pi’s GPIO header has eight ground pins (GND), which you…

6 minuti
how to connect a switch and an led to the pi

01 Wire in the switch The first job in interfacing a switch to the Pi is to connect one of the switch’s two terminals to a GPIO pin which will be configured as an input in the software) and connect the other of its terminals to 0V (GND). Having done this, the GPIO pin will be connected to 0V, a condition that the software will see as a logic 0, whenever the switch is closed, ie held down in the case of a push button or in its on’ state with a mechanically latching toggle switch. 02 Add a pull-up resistor Although a GPIO pin wired to a switch and 0V will be at logic when the switch is closed, it be ‘floating’ when it’s open. other words, it wouldn’t be certain whether…

5 minuti
logic circuitry explained

Since the processor in the Raspberry Pi can carry out any imaginable logic operation, it might be reasonable to assume that there’s no benefit to be gained from using external logic circuitry. While this would be true if the Pi has sufficient GPIO pins for your application, if you’re getting close to the limit then by using external hardware logic, you can reduce the number of pins needed. Our step-by-step guide provides some examples of how to do this; here we provide an introduction to logic circuitry. LOGIC LEVELS Logic components operate on two voltages that represent the binary values of 0 and 1 although, for some applications, it might be more appropriate to think of them as off and on respectively. In the case of the Pi’s GPIO pins, 0 is…

5 minuti
work with logic gates to use fewer gpio pins

01 Use a logic simulator Before looking at some examples of logic circuitry, here’s a tip to help you check your ideas out without wiring anything up at all. If you’re not quite sure which logic devices you need, this will allow you to be sure before placing an order for components. The secret is to use a logic simulator and there are lots to choose from, some that run locally under various operating systems and some that run online. Here we’re testing the circuit from Step 6 at logic.ly/demo. 02 Use a 2-to-4 decoder Driving four LEDs usually requires four GPIO pins. However, if we have an application where only one of them needs to be illuminated at any one time, as might be the case if the LEDs were indicating a…