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SAILSAIL

SAIL

August 2019

Editorial content covers the total sailing experience, featuring articles on coastal and blue-water cruising, trailer-sailing, racing, multihulls and monohulls, daysailing, one-design racing, and much more.

Paese:
United States
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Active Interest Media
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5,48 €(Incl. tax)
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10,97 €(Incl. tax)
12 Numeri

IN QUESTO NUMERO

access_time1 minuti
sail

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF PETER NIELSEN EXECUTIVE EDITOR ADAM CORT ASSOCIATE EDITOR LYDIA MULLAN WEB EDITOR EMME HURLEY CRUISING EDITOR CHARLES J. DOANE TECHNICAL EDITOR JAY E. PARIS ELECTRONICS EDITOR BEN ELLISON CHARTER EDITOR ZUZANA PROCHAZKA CONTRIBUTING EDITORS NIGEL CALDER, DON CASEY, TOM CUNLIFFE, DUNCAN KENT, TOM HALE, ANDY SCHELL, GORDON WEST, ANNIE DIKE, PETER SWANSON ART & DESIGN ART DIRECTOR STEVE JYLKKA ADVERTISING GROUP PUBLISHER BOB BAUER/bbauer@aimmedia.com MARKETING DIRECTOR SARAH WEBSTER OPERATIONS MANAGER ANDREA BAK HOWEY/ahowey@aimmedia.com EUROPEAN ADVERTISING DIRECTOR ELENA PATRIARCA/patriarca.elena@gmail.com NORTHEAST, UPPER MIDWEST & EASTERN CANADA REGIONAL MANAGER ANDREW HOWE/ahowe@aimmedia.com FLORIDA AND THE CARIBBEAN JESSICA SCHULTZ/jschultz@aimmedia.com MID-ATLANTIC, CENTRAL MIDWEST, WEST COAST, WESTERN CANADA REGIONAL MANAGER BLAKE CHASSE/bchasse@aimmedia.com MARKETPLACE SALES MANAGER CATHY BREEN/cbreen@aimmedia.com MARINE GROUP PRESIDENT GARY DE SANCTIS VP, MARKETING AND EVENTS JULIE JARVIE VP, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR WILLIAM SISSON PRODUCTION MANAGER SUNITA PATEL EVENT CONTENT MANAGER PETER SWANSON PRODUCTION COORDINATORS AMY PINTO, JENNIFER WILLIAMS, CHRIS CIRILLI TRAFFIC COORDINATOR SARA CARPENTER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONSUMER MARKETING DANA RAVEN CIRCULATION, FULFILLMENT MANAGER…

access_time2 minuti
letters

TETHERS: TO WEAR OR NOT TO WEAR Reading Charles J. Doane’s column Staying Aboard is Best (April 2019) made me rethink my experience of not staying on board. Four years ago I was catapulted off the bow of a boat in a collision at the start of a race. I had a life jacket on, but no tether. Fifteen minutes later, after being in water in the upper 40s, I was pulled on board the signal boat. Since then I have often wondered what would have happened had I been wearing a safety harness. I cannot be certain, but I know I would have been catapulted off, then jerked back very hard into the hull or Staying Aboard Is Best Wearing a harnessis never a safety guarantee bow pulpit. Hitting either…

access_time5 minuti
is cruising still safe

It is with great sadness that we read of the murder of New Zealand cruiser Alan Culverwell, and the attack on his family, by criminals who boarded their boat in Panama’s Guna Yala/San Blas Islands early in May. The San Blas were known as a “safe” area to cruise. Aside from petty theft, there had never been reason to believe the region was unsafe, especially when compared to some of the area’s cities. Many cruisers feel that living aboard, even in exotic locations, is safer than living on land, but is it really? As cruisers, we generally anchor where nature gives us the best protection from wind and waves, not from humans. The human element is far more unpredictable than any weather forecast. What was once a friendly area can have…

access_time3 minuti
pacific gem

Looking at the photos of previous Tahiti Pearl Regattas, I thought there was no way this place could be real, that it was the visual equivalent of “Fake News.” It’s just not possible for anywhere to have water that clear, skies that blue, settings so bucolic and evocative that they’re on every computer in the world as a screensaver to annoyingly remind you that you’re at your desk and not there. Yet when you do get to Tahiti, you see this it’s exactly as it’s depicted. The people are attractive, friendly and kind, the scenery is stunning, the temperatures in the Austral autumn remain unvaried in the low 80s, and you quickly feel your internal turbines winding down to a low hum. It’s no wonder those first European and later American…

access_time2 minuti
short tacks

AROUND THE WORLD, QUICKLY The recently announced Globe 40 will give Corinthian skippers a chance to compete against professionals in a full-on round-the-world race. Starting in 2021, the GLOBE40 will be raced by doublehanded crews sailing Class 40 boats. Starting in France, the route features stopovers in Mauritius, Auckland, New Zealand, Tahiti, Ushaia in Argentina, Recife in Brazil, and Grenada. The organizers expect a strong entry; more than 50 Class 40s competed in last year’s Route du Rhum transatlantic race. More information at globe40.com AROUND THE WORLD, SLOWLY Meanwhile, the next Golden Globe solo, nonstop round-the-world race is open for entries. There will be two classes in the 2022 event; the Suhaili class will see similar boats to those that competed in the 2018-19 race, while a new one-design class based on Bernard…

access_time8 minuti
night moves

After sailing on Puget Sound and in British Columbia for over 30 years, my wife, Jeri, and I retired to Florida, bought a house on Punta Gorda and worked hard to get it straight. The walls had been painted, furniture bought and assembled, belongings packed, transported and unpacked, and with only a couple of shower doors yet to be replaced, I started looking at the boat ads. I’ve always wanted a Gemini catamaran. But while I’d checked them out at boat shows over the years and sailed a friend’s, they are not common in the Pacific Northwest. Time, money, opportunity and the right boat also never seemed to line up. Soon I found Lady Marie, a 1998 Gemini 105M that had had only one owner from new. She was well equipped, with…

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