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The Cottage Journal

The Cottage Journal Winter 2021

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The Cottage Journal features decorating ideas, style tips, creative inspiration, and delicious recipes - and now you can enjoy every single page on the tablet! Create a warmer, more magical home with the beauty of nature and The Cottage Journal!

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Paese:
United States
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Hoffman Media
Frequenza:
Bimonthly
COMPRA NUMERO
8,50 €(VAT inclusa)
ABBONATI
17,85 €(VAT inclusa)
5 Numeri

in questo numero

2 minuti
editor’s letter

GRACEFUL LIVING AT HOME As we welcome a new year, we often aspire to fresh goals or projects for our homes. Our desire at The Cottage Journal is to give you plenty of inspiration from design experts and homeowners alike from across the country. While featuring a variety of aesthetics for many cottage-style tastes, we love to say we are all about personal style. It’s our way of making this your magazine for home decorating, and this Winter issue is no exception. Below are some highlights to look for in this issue. Natural light is so important, especially in colder climates, and our cover story, “Bright and Blended,” on page 55, demonstrates both its welcoming nature and its practicality in conserving energy. Interiors in the Benjack home are bathed in light, creating…

1 minuti
achieving a balanced design

Exuding warmth and simple sophistication, it’s no surprise contemporary style appeals to those wishing to take the best elements of past and present for a calming, serene design sure to stand the test of time. In her latest book, Contemporary Cottages, Molly Hyde English highlights delightful dwellings redesigned with this timeless approach in mind. Well-versed in the cottage lifestyle, Molly currently owns Camps and Cottages, her store located in Laguna Beach, California, where she sells curated home and lifestyle furnishings. Her previous publications include Camps and Cottages (2000) and Vintage Cottages (2007). From the enchanting entryways of quaint beach abodes to cozy mountain escapes boasting expansive windows, each cottage embraces its architectural elements, while added accents impart the tastes and personalities of those who live there. Find inspiration among the book’s 208…

2 minuti
the thrill of the hunt

Hannah McClain likely didn’t realize when she came across vintage Pyrex at a yard sale in 2016 that a new passion had been sparked. “One of the sets was still in the box,” she recalls. “The seal hadn’t even been broken yet.” The encounter planted a seed that, over the last few years, has blossomed into an impressive collection spanning decades of patterns, shades, and shapes. It’s a sight that’s common in many homes across the country, as vintage enthusiasts find themselves drawn to the iconic and colorful pieces that remain functional decades after their creation. Surprisingly, though, the Pyrex line began not in a kitchen, but in a lab. In 1908, Corning Glass Works developed a glass dubbed Nonex, which was formulated to withstand changes in temperature for use in railroad…

1 minuti
market finds

3 minuti
feels like home

Both originally from Louisiana, Laura Jelks and her husband have always known their style. Acadian architecture with accents of French and Southern styles mixed in makes Laura’s heart skip a beat, and it’s exactly why she fell in love with their current house. “The Charleston architecture of the neighborhood just felt like home,” she recalls of first seeing their Alabama abode. The Jelkses had already been living in the same neighborhood but were looking to downsize from their previous home, a 3,300-square-foot house not far away. “When we went in the house, we loved the open floor plan, 13-foot ceilings in the great room, and light spilling in from every direction,” Laura says. “It was only three bedrooms, but we were ready to downsize, and all the rooms we use are…

3 minuti
enjoying the space

It was the floor plan that first caught the attention of Michelle and Steven Kampwerth when they came across the house plans in a publication in 1997. “We decided we were going to be here for a long time, and we wanted to find a house that would grow with us and grow with our needs,” Michelle says, noting that they had moved around a lot prior to settling in Alabama. “We also didn’t want an especially large house that, when we would downsize, would be too large.” Equally important to the couple was building a home that they—along with their two young daughters—would really use, with no space left unenjoyed. “And the thing that appealed to us the most, I think, was the way the light would flow through all…