ESPLORALA MIA LIBRERIARIVISTE
CATEGORIE
IN EVIDENZA
ESPLORALA MIA LIBRERIA
 / Gossip e celebritá
The Hollywood ReporterThe Hollywood Reporter

The Hollywood Reporter

Women in Ent. Special 40A December 2019

The all-new Hollywood Reporter offers unprecedented access to the people, studios, networks and agencies that create the magic in Hollywood. Published weekly, the oversized format includes exceptional photography and rich features.

Paese:
United States
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Prometheus Global Media
Leggi di più
COMPRA NUMERO
6,59 €(VAT inclusa)
ABBONATI
93,39 €(VAT inclusa)
48 Numeri

IN QUESTO NUMERO

4 minuti
guest editor’s letter

“WE ARE LINKED, NOT RANKED.”GLORIA STEINEM In this issue, we are celebrating more than 100 women who defy expectations, shrug off limitations and harness their power without stripping it from others. As guest editor, I am exploring the phenomenon of feminine strength as it has been redefined by a new era in Hollywood, the era of the Sisterhood. Our links are stronger than ever before, and if we continue to see the value of our unity, I believe we will achieve the equality we have always deserved. We have become accustomed to the terms that strip us of our own strength as women. “Big dick energy,” “man up,” “have some balls,” “don’t be a pussy”—all not-so-subtle cues that power is inherently masculine. Even the word “feminine” has an unserious connotation of delicate…

2 minuti
contributors

Influencer Gigi Gorgeous, who boasts more than 2.9 million YouTube subscribers and offers details of her transition to womanhood on the site, shared with THR the female alliances that have shaped her identity (page 90). Among them, she cites director Barbara Kopple, who helmed the 2017 documentary This Is Everything: Gigi Gorgeous, and her own wife, model and LGBTQ activist Nats Getty, as examples of the strong women who surround her. Victoria Mahoney’s dreams of being whisked away on the Millennium Falcon came true on Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, on which she served as secondunit director. Recounting the experience (page 42), the first African American woman to direct for the blockbuster franchise was inspired by “up-and-comer outlier filmmakers,” she says, adding: “Some of us are leaving side windows open…

2 minuti
ten years and 250 mentees later, thr changes the lives of young women

Ten years ago, editors at The Hollywood Reporter had an intriguing idea: What if we created a mentorship program to accompany our annual Women in Entertainment gala, making it not just a celebration but a tool for social change? A decade later, about 250 high school juniors from some of the most underserved schools in Los Angeles have been paired with top-level women in film, television and music through a partnership with Big Brothers Big Sisters — and in many cases their lives have been transformed. They’ve been helped by the overwhelming generosity not just of individual mentors but also scholarship donors who’ve allowed these promising young women to go to the universities of their dreams, aided by Loyola Marymount University, which has given matching funds for 27 girls to study there. This…

1 minuti
meet this year’s crop of wie mentors

5 minuti
wie mentorship program

PAOL A FRANCO CREATIVE ASSISTANT, DRAMA ORIGINAL SERIES, NETFLIX Franco had always wanted to work with Shonda Rhimes. So when she got an opportunity to interview for an internship at ABC during her sophomore year at Loyola Marymount University, she was ecstatic. Then she discovered that she’d need to drive to Glendale. “I didn’t know how to drive on the freeway,” Franco says, describing the trip from her home in Inglewood like “traveling to another planet.” She didn’t get the gig. But two years later, she landed a postgraduation job as a creative assistant in Netflix’s drama series department, where she now helps with the development of projects that result from the Scandal creator’s overall deal with the streamer. “It’s such a full-circle moment for me,” says the 23-year-old, who acknowledges that…

4 minuti
‘anger is so empowering for me’

Nearly 25 years ago, Canadian singer Alanis Morissette mainstreamed rage feminism with her breakup anthem “You Oughta Know.” The song, from her landmark alt-rock album Jagged Little Pill, was a cri de coeur for a less vocal generation of women, catapulting Morissette, then 21, to stardom. It’s still one of the best-selling albums of all time with more than 33 million copies sold. But her furious stance — before such a mentality was widely shared and embraced — was critically dismissed by the (predominantly male) music establishment. Today, of course, Morissette, now 45 and the mother of three with her husband, rapper Souleye, isn’t angry anymore. A Broadway musical based on Jagged Little Pill —penned by Diablo Cody and directed by Diane Paulus — opened Dec. 5; next summer, she…