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The World of InteriorsThe World of Interiors

The World of Interiors April 2019

Get The World of Interiors digital magazine subscription today for the most influential and wide-ranging design and decoration magazine you can buy. Inspiring, uplifting and unique, it is essential reading for design professionals, as well as for demanding enthusiasts craving the best design, photography and writing alongside expert book reviews, round-ups of the finest new merchandise, plus comprehensive previews and listings of international art exhibitions.

Paese:
United Kingdom
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Conde Nast Publications Ltd
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12 Numeri

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growth industry

With 120 showrooms representing more than 600 of the world’s brightest and best interior brands, it’s no surprise that Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour is internationally recognised as being at the very core of the design community, which is more vital and vibrant than ever Situated on the banks of the river Thames, Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour has for more than 20 years championed the design world with its confident vision. Today, it’s home to 120 showrooms representing more than 600 of the world’s finest brands, spanning fabrics, furniture, lighting, kitchens, bathrooms, flooring, bespoke products and much more, all of which are celebrated for their quality and distinction. As the number-one design destination of its kind in Europe, it’s no wonder that Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour has become the ultimate port of…

access_time4 minuti
antennae

PHOTOGRAPHY: SIMON WITHAM (3, 8, 10, 4 OVERLEAF); AKIHIRO YOSHIDA (5 OVERLEAF)…

access_time5 minuti
palette cleanser

IN THE EARLY 1930s, in an age before Pantone references and exhaustive paint charts, colours were threatening to run riot. Identical hues were passing under different names, companies across the Commonwealth were struggling to standardise their offerings and shoppers couldn’t confidently colour-match articles in homes and offices. As Robert F. Wilson put it in a series of articles published at the time, no two people were speaking the same colour language. Having surveyed various products under the names ‘mole’ and ‘taupe’, for example, Wilson discovered that the former was usually a cool grey and the latter a warmer, browner shade. This was plainly ridiculous, since ‘taupe [is] merely the French name for mole’. A solution, however, was at hand. After 18 months of intensive research, a body called the British Colour…

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