Trains

Trains December 2018

TRAINS IS THE #1 MAGAZINE AMONG RAILROAD ENTHUSIASTS! EACH ISSUE IS PACKED WITH PROBING FEATURES, RAILROAD NEWS, EXPERT COMMENTARY, CUTTING-EDGE INDUSTRY REPORTS, DETAILED MAPS AND SPECTACULAR PHOTOGRAPHY COVERING RAILROADING’S INFLUENTIAL HISTORY AND EXCITING FUTURE.

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Paese:
United States
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequenza:
Monthly
7,01 €(VAT inclusa)
39,46 €(VAT inclusa)
12 Numeri

in questo numero

5 min
ask trains

Q I have seen headlights on locomotives on the front of the nose and up above the windshield by the numberboards. The location of the headlights seems to vary by model. What is the reason for this? —Garrison Counts, Colorado Springs, Colo. A There is no real standard on headlight placement across the industry. Oftentimes the location is simply the standard location the locomotive builder uses, which has varied over the years, or by a specific location requested by the railroad. Headlight placement can be determined by visibility of the railroad’s locomotive engineers in inclement weather, crew safety (so they don’t bump into a hot headlight lamp while using the front walkway), or ease of replacement by maintenance personnel. At times a railroad will change its headlight placement location, causing a fleet-wide…

17 min
diesel demise

A century ago, internal combustion technology set precedents for future development. Consider that in 1918, although the essential elements of the diesel-electric locomotive had been invented, these elements hadn’t yet been successfully combined. Yet, within 40 years, diesel-electric technology would prevail as the prime mover for American railroads. We cannot know what the future may bring for railroads, but by studying significant breakthroughs that enabled development of the diesel-electric we may envision paths for emerging technologies and the pitfalls they must overcome to achieve success. Will these new technologies emerge as dominant forms for American railroad motive power, or are they ultimately doomed to footnotes of transport history? What we know now is only part of the answer. For decades, hydrogen fuel cell technologies have offered the potential for an efficient means…

1 min
news photos

4 min
elrond lawrence’s top 10 hot spots

As much as I love traveling across the country, my native California has always held a unique appeal. How many states offer cities, mountains, valleys, deserts, and coastlines within their borders? I’ve been fortunate to photograph nearly every corner of this state that spans more than 770 miles from top to bottom. This list of Golden State retreats includes places I’ve railfanned for a lifetime and more recent favorites that demand repeat road trips. 1 CALIENTE The Tehachapi Mountains offer one of the greatest railroad shows on Earth, but my favorite haunt in this iconic range is the tiny outpost of Caliente, nestled in the hills and surrounded by what’s best described as a life-size model railroad. Photo angles are limitless and both telephoto and wide lenses feast on BNSF Railway…

2 min
worthy wyoming trek

I have a wanderlust for out-of-the-way places — places few people bother to stop at, much less spend time in. The Big Horn Basin in Wyoming is one such stop. Most of the people who get excited about Big Horn Basin are geologists and dinosaur bone hunters. A stray railfan may wander through on their way to a busy main line somewhere else. It’s easy to understand why. BNSF Railway’s Casper Subdivision main line running through this basin is among the quietest routes in Wyoming. Union Pacific’s Overland Route 200 miles to the south, sees dozens of trains daily. So does the coal train-rich joint BNSF/Union Pacific lines through the Powder River Basin 150 miles to the southeast. The Casper Sub, by contrast, hosts a few trains each day, and a handful of…

1 min
a glass half full

This image of Amtrak’s Albany-bound Empire Service train No. 233 headed north along the Hudson River was made from the Bear Mountain Bridge on Dec. 2, 2017. It was exactly 50 years earlier that monumental change had come to this line, New York Central’s “Water Level Route,” long the home of some of the nation’s poshest passenger trains. Unexpectedly and with breathtaking suddenness, the 20th Century Limited and the rest of the railroad’s “Great Steel Fleet” essentially died that day, shorn of amenities and identities. Along with its famous name, the Century lost its iconic sleeper-buffet-lounge-observation cars Hickory Creek and Sandy Creek Pullman-Standard built in 1948. Happily, both survive, and Hickory Creek, owned by the United Railroad Historical Society of New Jersey and operated by Star Trak Inc.’s Luxury Rail Vacations,…