Trains

Trains June 2018

TRAINS IS THE #1 MAGAZINE AMONG RAILROAD ENTHUSIASTS! EACH ISSUE IS PACKED WITH PROBING FEATURES, RAILROAD NEWS, EXPERT COMMENTARY, CUTTING-EDGE INDUSTRY REPORTS, DETAILED MAPS AND SPECTACULAR PHOTOGRAPHY COVERING RAILROADING’S INFLUENTIAL HISTORY AND EXCITING FUTURE.

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Paese:
United States
Lingua:
English
Editore:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequenza:
Monthly
7,01 €(VAT inclusa)
39,46 €(VAT inclusa)
12 Numeri

in questo numero

2 min
regulators show concerns about traffic slowness

Federal regulators are concerned about deterioration in railroad service metrics amid complaints from shipper groups. Those groups’ leaders say the railroad industry is mired in a slowdown that is delaying shipments of goods from automobiles to grain. The Surface Transportation Board in March asked Class I railroad CEOs to explain service problems and whether their railroads have the resources to meet current demand. Regulators also asked CEOs to outline their operational outlooks for the rest of the year. The board’s request came in response to letters from grain shippers and automakers that painted a picture of slow and erratic service across North America. Randall Gordon, president of the National Grain and Feed Association, blames the service decline on the industry’s pursuit of lower operating ratios. “This, in turn, has resulted in the systemic…

1 min
getting maintenance right

Until service extends to Orlando, all overnight maintenance work is performed at Brightline’s “Workshop B,” about a mile north of the West Palm Beach station. There, Chief Mechanical Officer Tom Rutkowski demonstrates how monitoring systems help detect potential problems and keep the trainsets moving. “Anything that’s a fault in one of the cars or locomotives comes up on that screen, and we’re often able to know about and respond to any issues often before the onboard crew does,” he says. Literally thousands of sensors on cars and locomotive constantly feed data back to West Palm Beach, even indicating when a passenger pushes back on a closing restroom door. “Suppose someone plugs a hair dryer into one of the at-seat 110-volt receptacles and blows a circuit,” Rutkowski says. “We learn what happened immediately;…

1 min
news photos

20 min
railway island paradise

Taiwan, also known as Formosa or “beautiful island,” may have the most concentrated and diverse railroad network per square mile on earth. Overshadowed by its two large neighbors, Japan and China, Taiwan is an amazing place that is frequently overlooked by the causal traveler. However, Taiwan’s emphasis on providing highq-uality rail services has resulted in an extensive modern rail-passenger network that is safe and convenient. As for sheer variety, where else can you find working 100-year-old, Lima-built Shays; GE electrics operating under wire in daily freight and passenger service; 42-inch-gauge tilt trains; and a world-class high speed rail line, all in an area slightly larger than the states of Maryland and Delaware? You can’t beat Taiwan for big-time railroading in a small package. Taiwan is located about 120 miles east of…

6 min
the batory interview

From the day he was sworn in as the head of the Federal Railroad Administration, Ronald L. Batory made his priorities clear: Railroad safety today and greater safety tomorrow through new technology. Batory told his audience that railroads were his “living dream, and safety is an endless theme in that dream. Rail safety is first and foremost. Its practice is non-compromising and non-negotiable. Safety is embedded into our lives. It is the keystone of the railroad industry,” he said. “Safety and creative innovation must be coupled together. Transformative technologies await us as we continue our 21stcentury journey.” Batory had been on the job less than a week when he sat down with Trains for an exclusive interview. If the direction he wants to lead the agency is clear, he did not discuss the…

18 min
brightline blazing new trails

A buzz of excitement filled the airy business-class car when Brightline’s 3:55 p.m. departure left Fort Lauderdale, Fla., for West Palm Beach on Feb. 1, 2018. Judging from overheard conversations, it was clear many travelers aboard the four-car BrightOrange trainset had never been on a passenger train. As the two Siemens Charger locomotives effortlessly reached a 79-mph cruising speed, riders kept a steady gaze out the big windows. Everyone wanted to watch the train whiz past stopped lines of cars along adjacent Dixie Highway or fly through downtowns like Delray Beach and Boca Raton. All along the route, observers looked right back at the speeding spectacle. It was less than three weeks since Brightline launched revenue service between Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach on Jan. 13 with 11 round trips on…