AppleMagazine

AppleMagazine #328

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:
United States
言語:
English
出版社:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
刊行頻度:
Weekly
¥443
¥3,883
26 号

この号

1
apple mulls refunds for battery replacement on old iphones

Apple is mulling refunds to customers who paid full price for battery replacements on older iPhones. Apple now offers a $50 discount as part of its apology for secretly slowing down the devices. Apple isn’t providing details on a potential rebate yet. The possibility was mentioned in Apple’s five-page letter to Sen. John Thune, a South Dakota Republican who demanded more details about the iPhone slowdown. Thune released Apple’s Feb. 2 response on Tuesday. Thune says Apple will follow up with additional information at a future date. Apple has been replacing batteries on older iPhones for $29 since late December, down from the usual $79. The offer is good through this year. A new battery is supposed to prevent older iPhones from bogging down.…

8
spacex: falcon heavy blasts off with sports car on top

SpaceX’s big new rocket blasted off Tuesday on its first test flight, carrying a red electric sports car aiming for an endless road trip past Mars. The Falcon Heavy rose from the same launch pad used by NASA nearly 50 years ago to send men to the moon. With liftoff, the Heavy became the most powerful rocket in use today, doubling the liftoff punch of its closest competitor. For SpaceX, the private rocket company run by Elon Musk, it was a mostly triumphant test of a new, larger rocket designed to hoist supersize satellites as well as equipment to the moon, Mars or other far-flung points. For the test flight, a red sports car made by another of Musk’s companies, Tesla, was the unusual cargo, enclosed in protective covering for the launch. The…

2
woman at top of her game seeks girls with a cyber-aptitude

Dora Schriro, Connecticut’s public safety commissioner, knows what it’s like to be a woman in the male-dominated world of criminal justice, so she jumped at the chance to work with organizers of a national competition being held this month to find and attract young women to the field of cybersecurity. The program, “Girls Go Cyberstart,” is being run by the SANS Institute, a security education organization. The online problem and puzzle-solving competition is open to high school-age girls in 18 states and American Samoa. The game, which starts Feb. 20, has participants protecting an imaginary headquarters and moon base by cracking codes, plugging security gaps and creating software tools. It is designed to test aptitude in areas such as cryptography and digital forensics. Only about 20 percent men or women have brains wired…

3
google’s ai push comes with plenty of people problems

Google CEO Sundar Pichai recently declared that artificial intelligence fueled by powerful computers was more important to humanity than fire or electricity. And yet the search giant increasingly faces a variety of messy people problems as well. The company has vowed to employ thousands of human checkers just to catch rogue YouTube posters, Russian bots and other purveyors of unsavory content. It’s also on a buying spree to find office space for its burgeoning workforce in pricey Silicon Valley. For a company that built its success on using faceless algorithms to automate many human tasks, this focus on people presents something of a conundrum. Yet it’s also a necessary one as lawmakers ramp up the pressure on Google to deter foreign powers from abusing its platforms and its YouTube unit draws fire…

5
olympic video and vr: guide to watching without a tv

Every Olympic event will be streamed live. But to watch online, you’ll still need to be a paying cable or satellite subscriber. As with past Olympics, NBC is requiring proof of a subscription. If you’ve already given up on traditional cable or satellite TV, you can sign up for an online TV service such as PlayStation Vue or YouTube TV. Otherwise, your video will cut out after a half-hour grace period. The subscription requirement also applies to coverage on virtual-reality headsets. More than 1,800 hours of online coverage in the U.S. with preliminary curling matches. Friday’s opening ceremony will be shown live online starting at 6 a.m. ET, and on NBC’s prime-time broadcast on a delayed basis at 8 p.m. NBC also plans live streaming of the closing ceremony on Feb. 25. Here’s a…

1
firefighters learn ways to use technology to battle blazes

Firefighters who are used to knocking down doors with heavy equipment and battling suffocating fire now are learning about new ways technology can help them more efficiently battle big blazes. The Spectrum reports trainees at the Utah Fire and Rescue Academy Winter Fire School in St. George spent a lot of time last month operating touch screens, analyzing data and learning ways to implement technology. Firefighters are learning to use three-dimensional map projections that pop up from the floor like holograms and show computerized simulation of how a fire would spread, or how traffic might impede their access, or how an unsuspected gas leak might complicate matters. Wildfires over the past year across the western U.S. have raised the profile of firefighting expertise and citizens’ expectations of their local departments. Information from: The Spectrum…