AppleMagazine

AppleMagazine #480

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AppleMagazine is a weekly publication jam-packed with breaking news, music, movies, TV shows, app reviews, and original content covering the latest goings-on in the world of Apple. AppleMagazine offers a new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading to your fingertips; with a global view of Apple and its influence on our lives - be it leisure, family or work. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, AppleMagazine will also keep you updated on the latest consumer-tech news. It's that simple! It’s all about Apple and its cultural influence, all in one place, and only one tap away. Subscribe to AppleMagazine today.

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:
United States
言語:
English
出版社:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
刊行頻度:
Weekly
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この号

4
watch out la: feds calculate riskiest, safest places in us

Spending her life in Los Angeles, Morgan Andersen knows natural disasters all too well. In college, an earthquake shook her home hard. Her grandfather was affected by recent wildfires in neighboring Orange County. “It’s just that constant reminder, ‘Oh yeah, we live somewhere where there’s natural disasters and they can strike at any time,’” said the 29-year-old marketing executive. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has calculated the risk for every county in America for 18 types of natural disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, volcanoes and even tsunamis. And of the more than 3,000 counties, Los Angeles County has the highest ranking in the National Risk Index. The way FEMA calculates the index spotlights places long known as danger spots, like Los Angeles, but some other places highlighted run counter to what…

1
microsoft says hackers viewed source code, didn’t change it

Microsoft said in a blog pos t that hackers tied to a massive intrusion of dozens of U.S. government agencies and private companies sneaked further into its systems than previously thought, although the intrusion doesn’t appear to have caused any additional harm. The company said the hackers were able to view some of the code underlying Microsoft software, but weren’t able to make any changes to it. Microsoft played down any risk associated with the additional intrusion, noting that its software development relies on code sharing within the company, a practice called “inner source.” Likewise, Microsoft said it doesn’t rely on keeping program code secret as a security measure and instead assumes that adversaries have seen its code and uses other defensive measures to frustrate attacks. The company said it found no evidence…

1
amazon gets into the podcast business

Amazon is jumping into the podcast business. The online shopping giant is buying Wondery, a 4-year-old producer of popular true crime podcasts such as “Dr. Death” and “Dirty John,” which was later turned into a TV series. An explosion of new podcasts has led to a number of acquisitions as competing platforms try to grow their audiences and their ad revenue. The music streaming platform Spotify bought two podcast companies in 2019 and it’s added high-profile hosts to its roster, including Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. Wondery podcasts will be part of Amazon’s music streaming service, but it will still be available on other platforms as well. “This is a pivotal moment to expand the Amazon Music offering beyond music as listener habits evolve,” Amazon said in a blog post. Terms of the acquisition were…

1
amazon buys 11 jets for 1st time to ship orders faster

Amazon said this week that it bought 11 jets from Delta and WestJet airlines to boost its growing delivery network and get orders to shoppers faster. The company said it’s the first time it has purchased planes for its delivery network. Over the past couple of years, Amazon has been leasing planes to build its fleet. “Having a mix of both leased and owned aircraft in our growing fleet allows us to better manage our operations,” said Sarah Rhoads, vice president of Amazon Global Air, in a blog post. Seattle-based Amazon has been working to deliver most of its packages itself and rely less on UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other carriers. Besides its fleet of planes, Amazon has also built several package-sorting hubs at airports, opened warehouses closer to where shoppers…

2
slack kicks off 2021 with a global outage

Slack, the messaging service used by millions of people for work and school, suffered a global outage on Monday, the first day back for most people returning from the New Year’s holiday. It’s the latest tech glitch to show how disruptive technical difficulties can be when millions of people are depending on just a few services to work and go to school from home during the pandemic. The company stopped releasing its daily user count after topping 12 million last year. “Our team is currently investigating and we’re sorry for any troubles this may be causing,” Slack said in a prepared statement. The outage began around 10 a.m. Eastern time and disrupted service in the U.S., Germany, India, the U.K., Japan and elsewhere. At 12:30 p.m., service was still sporadic and Slack said the…

9
greem future: how tech giants can be part of the solution

With consumers encouraged to upgrade their smartphones on a near-annual basis and the throwaway culture of technology continuing apace, e-waste is fast-becoming one of the key environmental concerns. Less than 40% of our phones, tablets, and laptops are recycled, with the rest destined for landfill. The key to change lies with us - and our technology giants. THE RISE OF E-WASTE Though e-waste has been a concern for a number of years, it’s only in the past decade that consumers have adopted technology in such a way that is causing catastrophic damage to our environment. According to one recent study, the average home now contains 19 devices , with IoT technologies such as smart speakers ballooning that figure. Data out of Europe suggests just 40% of e-waste in the European Union is…