Newsweek August 30, 2013

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United States
言語:
English
出版社:
The Newsweek/Daily Beast Company LLC
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Weekly
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¥5,753
37 号

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2
arsenio is back

When it was my turn to ask Arsenio Hall a question, I scanned my list: He’d already covered how this show might be different from the last—“less hair, less shoulder pads.” He was coy about who the first guests will be when he returns to the late-night talk-show circuit September 9 after a two-decade hiatus. “More exciting if it’s just a series of surprises,” he said. He’d already addressed the obligatory “dog pound” question (the old Arsenio Hall Show audience was known for woofing him onto the stage every night). Since this was a conference call with mostly newspaper reporters, I’d get one question, maybe one follow-up. I was pretty surprised that this was as close as I’d be able to get. After 20 years of silence, was Hall still so…

3
from professor to savior

And you thought your first week of work was tough. Imagine taking the helm of the central bank of the world’s second-most-populous country and its 10th-largest economy at a time fraught with economic peril. Or perhaps more vividly: imagine taking the helm of a huge, leaky ship as it sputters toward a maelstrom. That’s precisely what Raghuram Rajan, a 50-yearold University of Chicago professor, is about to do. On September 5, he assumes the position of governor of the Reserve Bank of India for a three-year term. The central bank’s offices in Mumbai are a long way from the placid, Gothic campus on the south side of Chicago that Rajan has called home for most of the past two decades. But Rajan has displayed an ability to straddle the worlds of a…

2
exporting homophobia

A senior British politician has accused Russian officials of trying to have him removed from his post as the head of an influential parliamentary committee. His crime: being openly gay. Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, has overseen the introduction of a law banning the promotion of “homosexual behavior,” prompting human-rights activists to call for a boycott of the Winter Olympics in Sochi. For Chris Bryant, a Labour M.P., Russian homophobia just got personal. He says two Conservative M.P.s have informed him of secret conversations with officials at the Russian Embassy in London in which it was suggested that Bryant should be removed as the chairman of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Russia to improve relations between the nations. “The embassy doesn’t like having a gay guy in charge of the group. This…

3
the bachelor

A promising politician from a mid-Atlantic state remains unmarried. At some point in his career, rumors begin to fly. Rivals question his masculinity, his mannerisms, his predilections. Why are you a bachelor? Why no wife? The politician, in this case, was James Buchanan; the time was the mid-1800s. But some things never change. In a profile published August 26 in The Washington Post, Newark, New Jersey, Mayor Cory Booker—early 40s, unmarried, and running for New Jersey’s vacant Senate seat —was asked to address the Buchananesque gossip about his own sexuality. “People who think I’m gay, some part of me thinks it’s wonderful,” he said. “Because I want to challenge people on their homophobia. I love seeing on Twitter when someone says I’m gay, and I say, ‘So what does it matter…

2
senator oddball

The receptionist answers the phone “Dr. Coburn” when you call the senator’s office, underscoring the importance he attaches to his hometown identity. A gynecologist who has delivered 4,000 babies, Tom Coburn prides himself on his outsider status in Washington—a distinction that cemented his bond with Barack Obama when they arrived in the Senate at the same time in 2005. In the years since, it’s become well known in Washington that Coburn, despite being a conservative Republican, is one of Obama’s closest friends in the Senate. And so it caught people’s attention when Coburn opined recently at a town-hall meeting, in Muskogee, Oklahoma, that there’s “some intended violation of the law in this administration,” mostly with regard to Obamacare, which Coburn opposes. “I don’t have the legal background to know if that…

3
the italian idol

To his moviegoing compatriots, he is the sexiest star since Sophia Loren—despite a soaring forehead, a bald patch, and a face drawn with the crevices of knowledge. He has won more than a dozen best-actor awards at Italian film festivals over the years, and Italian Vogue calls him the “most versatile Italian actor in the history of Italian cinema.” Now, with the release of La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty) the rest of the world will get a chance to see for themselves. And even if not everyone will agree with the Italians’ sometimes overwrought and exalted pronouncements, it is clear that the 54-year-old actor, Toni Servillo, is on the verge of making it beyond his country’s borders, as the press previews of his new film suggest. (The British newspaper The…