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AppleMagazineAppleMagazine

AppleMagazine #404

AppleMagazine is a weekly publication packed with news, iTunes and Apps reviews, interviews and original articles on anything and everything Apple. AppleMagazine brings a new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading to your fingertips; with a global view of Apple and its influence on our lives - be it leisure activities, family or work-collaborative projects. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, AppleMagazine will also keep you updated on the latest weekly news. It's that simple! It’s all about Apple and its worldwide culture influence, all in one place, and only one tap away. Get AppleMagazine digital subscription today.

국가:
United States
언어:
English
출판사:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
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uber and airbnd: how the ‘sharing economy’ is transforming travel

THE TECH-INSPIRED TRANSFORMATION OF AN INDUSTRY These days, when you want to quickly travel from one place to another but lack your own car, there’s a good chance that you opt not to hail a yellow taxicab, but instead to call upon the services of a regular driver through the Uber app on your iPhone. Similarly, when perusing accommodation options for your next getaway, you might do so through your device’s Airbnb app, which gives you the option of booking a stay in someone’s home rather than a traditional hotel. However, why are services like Uber and Airbnb proving so successful in upending the taxi and hotel industries respectively? On that whole subject, we could write a thesis. However, put simply, the main contributing factors behind these upheavals are the relatively low…

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justice dept. ratchets up antitrust scrutiny of big tech

The U.S. Department of Justice opened a sweeping antitrust investigation of major technology companies and whether their online platforms have hurt competition, suppressed innovation or otherwise harmed consumers. It said the probe will take into account “widespread concerns” about social media, search engines and online retail services. Its antitrust division is seeking information from the public, including those in the tech industry. “Without the discipline of meaningful market-based competition, digital platforms may act in ways that are not responsive to consumer demands,” Makan Delrahim, the department’s chief antitrust officer, said in a statement. “The Department’s antitrust review will explore these important issues.” The terse but momentous announcement follows months of concern in Congress and elsewhere over the sway of firms like Google, Facebook and Amazon. Lawmakers and Democratic presidential candidates have…

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is ‘big tech’ too big? a look at growing antitrust scrutiny

Is Big Tech headed for a big breakup? The U.S. Justice Department has announced a major antitrust investigation into unnamed tech giants, while the House Judiciary Committee has begun an unprecedented antitrust probe into Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple over their aggressive business practices, and promises “a top-to-bottom review of the market power held by giant tech platforms.” In addition, at least two 2020 presidential hopefuls have expressed support for breaking up some of technology’s biggest players amid concerns they have become too powerful. Experts say breakups are unlikely in the short term, and Rep. David Cicilline, the Rhode Island Democrat who leads the subcommittee pursuing the House investigation, called such measures a “last resort.” But even without that, Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple could face new restrictions on their power. Google, Facebook, Amazon…

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macos catalina: giant leap for mac-kind

In June, Apple lifted the lid on macOS Catalina, one of the biggest releases for the Mac in years. As we get closer to public release this September, we thought we’d go hands-on with some of the most anticipated features to offer our thoughts, including cross-platform apps, the removal of iTunes, and SideCar, which allows an iPad to be used as a second screen… GOODBYE, iTUNES macOS upgrades are typically more reserved than the all-guns-blazing iOS overhauls, but it was the Mac that took center stage at this year’s WWDC. One of the biggest talking points was iTunes - or, at least, the removal of it from the Mac after more than eighteen years. As Apple looks to streamline the Mac, it decided to split up the bloated software and introduce new…

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instagram expands hiding ‘likes’ to make you happier

Instagram is expanding a test to hide how many “likes” people’s posts receive as it tries to combat criticism that such counts hurt mental health and make people feel bad when comparing themselves to others. The Facebook-owned photo-sharing service has been running the test in Canada since May. Now, Facebook said the test has been expanded to Ireland, Italy, Japan, Australia, Brazil and New Zealand. Facebook typically tests new Facebook and Instagram features in smaller markets before bringing them to the U.S., if it ever does. The company would not comment on what it’s learned from the Canada test or if it has plans to expand it to the U.S. any time soon. One group that may be affected is Instagram “influencers,” the major, minor or micro celebrities who use social media to…

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equifax to pay up to $700m in data breach settlement

Equifax will pay at least $700 million — and potentially much more — to settle lawsuits over a 2017 data breach that exposed the Social Security numbers and similar sensitive information of roughly half of the U.S. population. The settlement with federal authorities and states, includes up to $425 million in monetary relief to consumers, a $100 million civil penalty, and other offers to the nearly 150 million people who could have been affected. It can’t, however, guarantee safety for individuals whose stolen information could circulate on the internet for decades. The breach was one of the largest ever to threaten Americans’ private information. The credit reporting company didn’t notice the intruders targeting its databases, who exploited a known security vulnerability that Equifax hadn’t fixed, for more than six weeks. The…

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