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Louisiana Cookin'Louisiana Cookin'

Louisiana Cookin' March - April 2015

Louisiana Cookin' is the only national magazine for the connoisseur of Louisiana's unique culture, cuisine, and travel destinations - and now you can enjoy every single page on your tablet! Each issue contains more than 50 authentic recipes, with tips from professional chefs and home cooks alike.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hoffman Media
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$19.99
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time6 min.
bloody marys

Complex, delightfully spicy, and a hit at breakfast or dinner, the Bloody Mary is one of the crown jewels of Louisiana’s cocktail culture. Stories abound about when and how the drink came to be, but according to the most popular legend, it was first craft ed in the 1920s as a simple combination of vodka and tomato juice. Speculation suggests that the creator was Fernand Petiot, a Parisian bartender with years of experience in the hospitality industry. The tavern he managed, Harry’s New York Bar, was popular in American expat circles, and rumor has it that Ernest Hemingway was a fixture on its stools. In 1934, Fernand came to the states and eventually took a gig at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City. It was then that Louisiana’s famous Tabasco…

access_time5 min.
springtime soups

W hether for convenience or comfort, Louisianians have a penchant for soup. When the envie strikes, we pull out our favorite Dutch oven and get to task. Here we have taken some of the boldest spring flavors, ranging from a decadent potato and leek soup to a light shrimp, tomato, and kale soup. Whatever the occasion, treat yourself and your family to some hot, delicious goodness. CREAMY NEW POTATO AND LEEK SOUP MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 cup chopped yellow onion 2 leeks, sliced 1⁄4-inch thick 3 cloves garlic, minced ¼ cup all-purpose flour 2 (32-ounce) containers vegetable broth 1 cup half-and-half 3 pounds new potatoes, peeled and cut into 1⁄2-inch chunks 1 tablespoon minced fresh dill 1 tablespoon minced fresh chives 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley 1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black…

access_time3 min.
lively spirits

AMIDST THE HISTORIC SURROUNDINGS of the Alexandria Garden District, visitors will find Spirits Food and Friends, a modern oasis of classic American cuisine, craft cocktails, and live music. Locals have known about the hotspot for decades, but recently the menu has grown with some fresh ideas and new items at the hands of Chef Stephen Naegle. Having grown up in Colombia and Mexico City, Stephen brings a wealth of experience and a variety of influences to the lively American grill. “I was fortunate enough to have a family of mostly women, and I was in the kitchen from an early age. I had that Hispanic family influence,” says Stephen. “Central and South America are kind of like Louisiana in that everything revolves around food.” Stephen began cooking during the fusion era of the…

access_time1 min.
a delicious legacy

IN LOUISIANA, there is a strong connection between food and family. Recipes are discovered, cultivated, and passed down through the generations, creating happy memories with the ones we love. Nell Aucoin Robarge of Baton Rouge inherited this recipe for Crawfish Pie from her mother, Brenda Aucoin, who adapted it from an old church cookbook. Growing up, Nell remembers enjoying the pie, along with fried fish and other Cajun delicacies, when extended family would come to visit. Today, she makes it on weekends and when her children are in town. CRAWFISH PIE MAKES ABOUT 6 SERVINGS ½ cup salted butter 1 large onion, diced (about 11⁄2 cups) ½ bell pepper, seeded and diced (about 1⁄2 cup) 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 (10.75-ounce) can cream of mushroom soup 1 (5-ounce) can evaporated milk 1 teaspoon salt ¾ teaspoon ground black pepper ½…

access_time1 min.
salad shakeup

WHEN YOU THINK SALAD, do you think boring? Don’t get stuck in a salad rut. Salads are supposed to be healthy, but most folks’ idea of a salad is the same old iceberg lettuce, croutons, and high-fat dressing. Well salads have come a long way. This version of Roasted Vegetables with Pecans over Hearty Greens is not your old-fashioned, humdrum bunch of leafy vegetables. Versatile and flavor-packed, this can be served as salad, over pasta, or as a side dish. Roasting simplifies cooking; just toss it in the oven and forget about it. And you know from the color that you are eating healthy—this salad is a vibrant rainbow of nutrition. _ With more than one million cookbooks sold, Holly Clegg, author of the bestselling trim & TERRIFIC® cookbook series, has…

access_time3 min.
the isleños and their culinary influence

DURING THE 15TH CENTURY, Spain established its first colony in the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa. Because of their excellent geographic position, the Canaries became the launching point, or at least the last stop, before the grand adventure of crossing the Atlantic Ocean to the New World. Those islands are the ancestral home of many residents of St. Bernard Parish and other places around New Orleans. These people are known as los Isleños or Islanders. On behalf of Spain, the Isleños also colonized Caribbean Islands, Venezuela, and the Philippine Islands. When Spain acquired New Orleans and the territory west of the Mississippi River from France in 1766, it began to use Louisiana as a protective buffer between the British and the Spanish colony of Mexico, which contained valuable gold…

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