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Louisiana Cookin'Louisiana Cookin'

Louisiana Cookin' November - December 2016

Louisiana Cookin' is the only national magazine for the connoisseur of Louisiana's unique culture, cuisine, and travel destinations - and now you can enjoy every single page on your tablet! Each issue contains more than 50 authentic recipes, with tips from professional chefs and home cooks alike.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hoffman Media
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$19.99
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
making time

AS THE HOLIDAYS arrive, I try to take a moment for myself to reflect on the year that’s passed, the meals shared with family and friends, and the time spent with loved ones. It can be difficult, though. With amazing events like Celebration in the Oaks in New Orleans, the Festival of the Bonfires in Lutcher, and the twinkling masterpiece that is the Holiday Trail of Lights in north Louisiana, I often feel pulled every which way. This year, I will be making a concerted effort to cook more family meals at home, and the recipes included in this November/ December issue will make that a joy. There are a few recipes, like the English Milk Punch (page 63), Chef Frank Brigtsen’s Rabbit and Andouille Gumbo (page 42), and the Caramel Pecan Doberge…

access_time1 min.
simple pleasures

WHO SAYS YOU can’t give into your temptations? During the holiday season, when cookies, cakes, and confections of every sort are everywhere, there’s no need to worry about what to serve for a daintier (but still completely decadent) dessert: chocolate soufflé. These little cups are elegant, flavorful, and won’t wreck your diet. Wins all around! LIGHT CHOCOLATE SOUFFLÉ MAKES 6 SERVINGS 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1/3 cup plus 4 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided 1/3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar ½ cup water 1 teaspoon espresso powder 3 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt 2 large egg yolks 5 large egg whites ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar 4 cups hot water Garnish: chopped semisweet chocolate, cocoa powder 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Line the bottom of a 13x9-inch baking dish with a thin dish towel.…

access_time1 min.
dressing up

THERE ARE FEW, if any, more quintessential New Orleans holiday dishes than oyster dressing. Creole dressings, sometimes called stuffings, are full of the trinity, day-old New Orleans-style French bread, and quite often, delicious local seafood. Pre-shucked Louisiana oysters, which come packed in their own liquid, are not only a terrific time-saver in this recipe but the oyster liquor is also key to the texture and flavor. The result is one of the most comforting dishes you’ll eat all season. CREOLE BAKED OYSTER DRESSING MAKES ABOUT 10 SERVINGS 2 (16-ounce) containers shucked oysters, drained, liquor reserved 6 tablespoons butter 1½ cups chopped onion 1/3 cup chopped green onion 1 cup chopped celery 1 cup chopped green bell pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 2 garlic cloves, minced 12 ounces day-old French bread, cut into…

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5 dishes to try

DUCK AARON STUFFED AVOCADO GROUPER FLEUR DE LIS CRAWFISH FONDUE OSCAR-STYLE FILET The menu is updated every so often, but the Stuffed Avocado with jumbo lump crabmeat and raspberry chipotle glaze, pecan-crusted Snapper Supper with bacon, scallion compote, puff pastry and red pepper jelly gastrique, and Baked Brie with blackened Gulf shrimp and demiglace have become customer favorites. Seasonal additions, like the shrimp and sweet potato dish Janohn’s offers in the fall, are also popular. In addition to Gulf Coast seafood, Aaron seeks out seasonal and accessible products from local suppliers, such as heirloom tomatoes from Ed Lester Farms in Coushatta, pecans from Little Eva Plantation in Cloutierville, and specialty meats from Guillory’s Grocery & Meat Market in Pine Prairie. The restaurant’s Boyce location, only 16 miles from Aaron’s hometown of Pineville, was a natural choice. “That community…

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more pro gumbo tips

“I LIKE TO MAKE A DRY ROUX (OVEN-ROASTED FLOUR), THEN SIFT IT INTO THE GUMBO WHILE WHISKING VIGOROUSLY. THIS WILL ABSORB THE EXTRA OIL AND GIVE A LITTLE MORE YIELD.” —JOEY LABELLA, CAFÉ HOPE “FOR A RICHER FLAVOR, TRY USING CLARIFIED ANIMAL FATS LIKE BACON OR DUCK. USE JUST THE RENDERED FAT OR ADD IT TO OIL, BUT BE CAREFUL: IT BROWNS MUCH QUICKER.” —CHEF CHRIS BARBATO, THE COUNTRY CLUB “IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO COOK THE ONIONS IN THE ROUX BY THEMSELVES.IT CARAMELIZES THE ONIONS, WHICH IN TURN DARKENS YOUR GUMBO AND ADDS DEPTH OF FLAVOR.” —CHEF AARON BURGAU, PATOIS “I LOVE TO USE SMOKED CHICKEN IN MY GUMBO. AFTER SMOKING THE CHICKEN, USE THE BONES TO MAKE A REALLY FLAVORFUL, SMOKY STOCK.” — CHEF BRENDAN CAHILL, BAR FRANCES…

access_time5 min.
the ultimate turducken

For added holiday table flair, many Louisianans turn to the Turducken. This magical combination of turkey, chicken, and duck, along with a flavorful stuffing, has grown in popularity over the past few decades and never fails to delight family and friends. While the concept of stuffing whole animals with other, smaller animals has been around for centuries, Cajun Chef Paul Prudhomme took it to the national stage, and its star has only risen. Now, the turducken is available for purchase at many butchers and markets around Louisiana, and a few online retailers can ship them anywhere in the country. For this comforting holiday menu, we offer a few tips to help you make the most juicy and tender turducken yet, pairing it with some of the season’s best flavors. SATSUMA OLD FASHIONED MAKES 1 SERVING 1…

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