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Louisiana Cookin'Louisiana Cookin'

Louisiana Cookin' September - October 2013

Louisiana Cookin' is the only national magazine for the connoisseur of Louisiana's unique culture, cuisine, and travel destinations - and now you can enjoy every single page on your tablet! Each issue contains more than 50 authentic recipes, with tips from professional chefs and home cooks alike.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hoffman Media
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$19.99
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
cultivating passion

On cooler autumn days when I walk through the Crescent City Farmers’ Market, I am constantly amazed at the variety of local products available to folks in South Louisiana. Rice, sugar, incredible seafood, and even salt from Avery Island make eating locally—and eating well—a simple proposition.While at the market chatting with farmers and fishermen, I oft en see local chefs and their foragers doing the same. Th e level of partnership between chefs and purveyors here in New Orleans and around Louisiana is refreshing and remarkable. By knowing where their ingredients come from, and the hardworking folks who cultivate them, creative chefs can make the most of every season.It is chefs like these that we honor in our annual Chefs to Watch awards. Th ese innovative, passionate chefs respect Louisiana…

access_time1 min.
readers' letters

My husband and son are both avid fishermen, so I can’t tell you how glad I was to see those whole fish recipes in the “Fresh & Simple” article in your May/June issue (page 65). Now I’ve just got to get them out on the water to bring home some fresh fish. (I’m hoping for red snapper!)Julie Parks Houma, LouisianaSince reading the Creole Mini Quiche recipe in the July/August issue (page 14), I have been obsessed. It’s just too easy to change up the ingredients and try new combinations. So far I’ve filled them with smoked boudin, crawfish, and even barbecued chicken.June Ramos Shreveport, LouisianaI’ve always been interested in cocktails and really enjoyed trying some of the New Orleans classics in the July/August cocktail story. As I’ve expanded my collection…

access_time3 min.
the ultimate louisiana burger

It’s been five years since I traveled from Lafayette, Louisiana, to compete in Napa, California, on the nationally televised Food Network Challenge. It was September 2008 at the Sutter Home Winery Build-A-Better-Burger cook-off where, as a finalist, I cooked my Bluesiana Burger and won the respect of the judges. I guess that out of 9,000 burger entries, first runner-up was pretty respectable.Meat, bread, and other stuff —some might say burgers are pretty simple. To be honest, they are correct—a basic, plain, and simple hamburger can oft en be memorable. So, the premise of my new Louisiana burger is best described as simplicity and focus on quality ingredients that elevate the basic experience. If truth be told, simplicity can take a lot of thought —and work.For me, cooking is a journey…

access_time1 min.
quick cajun comfort

Whether for a big tailgate or a quick weeknight supper, it’s hard to beat the warm comfort that macaroni and cheese brings to the table. Here, we kicked up the spice and added smoked andouille sausage for a distinctly Cajun flavor. For an unexpected twist, try different pasta shapes. Some of our favorites include cavatappi, shells, and orecchiette.CAJUN MAC & CHEESEMAKES 4 SERVINGS1 (14-ounce) package andouille sausage, cut into .-inch slices1 cup chopped red bell pepper1 cup chopped green bell pepper⅓cup all-purpose flour2. teaspoons Cajun seasoning1 quart whole milk16 ounces shredded American cheese3 cups shredded mild Cheddar cheese1 (16-ounce) package elbow pasta, cooked and kept warm1. In a large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat until lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Add red and green bell pepper; cook until tender,…

access_time5 min.
big nights tasty bites

If you have been a Louisiana cook long enough, you remember the days when our state’s culinary world was a well-kept secret. Th ose days are long gone, and if you need proof, tune into the Bravo television network for season 11 of the ever-popular cooking competition show, Top Chef. In conjunction with the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation and the Louisiana Office of Tourism, Bravo announced this fall’s season will originate from New Orleans. Th ose of us who affectionately refer to ourselves as “saucepan nerds” could only breathe deeply and exclaim in unison, “It’s about time!”Diners on Tableau’s large French Quarter balcony are in for a treat. (PHOTO COURTESY CAROLINE PARKER)Bravo, which has emerged as an industry leader in reality television (Real Housewives of everywhere, Project Runway, among…

access_time2 min.
the new "kfc" (korean fried chicken)

Fried chicken is a staple in culinary cultures from the Far East to the Wild West, and each is unique in its own way. Whether pan-fried, stir-fried, or deep-fried, chicken goes so well with batter and oil that it truly could be a food group of its own.In Louisiana, places like Willie Mae’s Scotch House in New Orleans, Delpit’s Chicken Shack in Baton Rouge, and Hot Food Express in Lafayette, create out-of-this-world fried chicken in the state’s own style. However, there is one variety of fried chicken that might just be out-trending those south of the Mason-Dixon Line: Korean fried chicken.With a thin and crispy batter, this version from East Asia has found a place on the menu of restaurants like Phillip Lopez’s Root in the Crescent City. I recently…

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