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MacLife

MacLife April 2021

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Mac|Life is the leading independent magazine devoted to all things Apple. For over five years, Mac|Life has helped both new and veteran users get more out of their iPhones, iPads, Macs, and more, with coverage that cuts through today's glut of apps and accessories to find what matters most. With a bright, clean design and casual tone, Mac|Life offers an easy and enjoyable way to keep up with the latest Apple trends and topics.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Limited US
Frequency:
Monthly
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12 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
help with moving?

In the last few issues of Mac|Life we’ve been extolling the virtues of the M1 Macs, but I wonder if we needn’t have bothered — you, the reader, seem to be lapping up the new tech. After the last newsletter I sent round, many of you replied to tell me just how much you like the new Macs. And it’s not just you — many of our regular Mac|Life freelancers have been purchasing them too, eager to make the upgrade in order to test the power in Apple’s latest chips. The only person I know of that doesn’t have one yet is me. Yes, you heard it right — the editor of this very magazine doesn’t have a new Mac yet. Here’s hoping Apple will kindly loan me one of…

2 min.
all–new macbook pro this year?

AFTER REVAMPING THE entry–level MacBook Pro last year, Apple is working on revolutionary new 14–inch and 16–inch models, credible sources say. Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who has a good track record forecasting Apple products, said in an investor briefing that the new MacBook Pro models will feature a flat–edged design “similar to the iPhone 12,” physical function keys instead of a Touch Bar, and the return of the MagSafe charging connector. (Commentators believe this does not mean the magnetic charger currently available for the iPhone 12 series, but the older magnetic plug last used on Macs in 2019, when the 2017 model MacBook Air was discontinued.) The new models will continue the transition of the notebook line to Apple silicon, but it’s likely they’ll use a new generation of chip, not the same…

2 min.
users deserting whatsapp

MESSAGING APP SIGNAL has seen a surge in signups following panic about changes to WhatsApp’s privacy policy. WhatsApp is the most popular messaging app in the world by a long way, with around two billion monthly active users. Facebook acquired the company for $19bn in 2014, and soon afterwards added end–to–end encryption, ensuring the privacy and security of users’ messages. In 2016, WhatsApp users received a one–time opportunity to opt out of sharing account data with Facebook. Now WhatsApp has notified users that as of February 8, 2021, their data will be shared with the parent company, with no opt–out. (It’s not clear whether any 2016 opt–out will continue to be honored.) The data collected includes your phone number, the phone numbers of other people in your address books, profile names and…

1 min.
news in brief

PACEMAKER WARNING Apple Watch contains tech to detect heart problems, but the magnets and electromagnetic fields in iPhone and MagSafe accessories could affect medical devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators. In January a medical journal reported that doctors in Michigan held an iPhone 12 near an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, which immediately went into a “suspended” state. They warned patients not to carry an iPhone in their shirt pocket. In a support note (support.apple.com/en-us/HT211900), Apple says “to avoid any potential interactions with these devices” keep your iPhone and MagSafe accessories more than six inches away, or 12 inches when wirelessly charging. Although “all iPhone 12 models contain more magnets than prior iPhone models,” Apple adds, they shouldn’t pose any greater risk of magnetic interference to medical devices than prior models. AIRPODS 3 COMING? Apple…

3 min.
the shift

FOR THE LAST few years the word “pro” has sat uneasily as a label across a range of Apple’s products. In times past the simplest explanation of what “pro” meant for Apple’s laptops or desktops was: more power. Faster processors or more cores, and usually some extra expandability. But more recently it’s been fuzzier, and 2020’s releases have made it more so. The iPhone 12 Pro is no more powerful than the iPhone 12, the iPad Pro is on roughly the same level as the iPad Air, and both the MacBook Pro and MacBook Air now share one extremely powerful chip. Making such incredible processor advancements means Apple has effectively commodified “pro” performance. It’s normal now to be able to edit 100–megapixel, multilayer images on a MacBook Air. So what…

3 min.
letter of the month

In your response to the Letter of the Month in the January 2021 issue about music CDs and ripping them, you said this regarding using an Apple SuperDrive: “The Apple SuperDrive reads and writes… plugged into an USB port (obviously on newer MacBooks you’ll also need a hub to do this).” At least on my older Macs, if I don’t plug the SuperDrive directly into the USB port, it will not work. Plugging into a powered hub (either of the two different hub brands I have) is not sufficient to get my SuperDrive to be recognized by my Macs. The disk will not get sucked into the SuperDrive. So, are you certain that on USB–C Macs you can go through a hub with a SuperDrive? MIKE SAKARIAS According to Apple you can: support.apple.com/en-gb/HT202665.…