EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Food & Wine
Martha Stewart Living

Martha Stewart Living January/February 2018

We've expanded our magazine to bring you more of the ideas you want for organizing, entertaining, cooking, and decorating- all in one place. Plus, our special Gardening issue, Entertaining Issue, Decorating Issue and Holiday issue are all yours to enjoy as a subscriber.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
Frequency:
Monthly
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10 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
plan on it

LIKE FRESHLY FALLEN SNOW without any footprints, or a brand-new notebook that’s yet to be cracked open, the beginning of the year is always exciting. With 12 months stretched out before us, the possibilities are vast; it’s only a question of how to embark on them. And while I don’t know anyone who makes resolutions anymore (maybe because we’ve all learned it’s the fastestway to fail at them), plenty of us still quietly refocus on life and what we want to accomplish—even if we keep the latter part to ourselves. But with the right motivation, lasting change can indeed be good, necessary, and possible. When the goal of getting in shape inevitably comes up, I think of my friend who devised a clever plan to get herself back in the…

2 min.
out & about

ON THE ROAD FIT FOR A KING The Crescent City knows how to prep for Lent. New Orleanians feast between Epiphany and Mardi Gras, enjoying everything that’ll be forbidden. The pastry that reigns supreme is the king cake, a brioche-like ring drizzled with purple, green, and yellow icing, with a lucky baby figurine baked inside. (The finder gets a day of glory, and hopefully not a chipped tooth.) Local bakeries bring their unique touch: Sucré sprinkles its pastel renditions (right) with raw cane sugar. Here, three other regal options. New Orleans MANNY RANDAZZO An unflashy family recipe that’s stood its ground since 1965 (no sprinkles or glitter here) draws long lines to this Metairie cake shop. randazzokingcake.com CAKE CAFÉ & BAKERY Unorthodox fillings—like apple and goat cheese, and raspberries and cream—put this eatery in the Marigny on…

1 min.
let it snow

Dessert Course Mount Washington Valley’s wooded trails fill with snowshoers for its annual chocolate fest on February 25. Buckle on a pair, and forge a path from fondue to cookies to dipped strawberries. Intervale, New Hampshire; mwvski touring.org Cozy Caravan Old Faithful doesn’t skip the off-season. When the park’s blanketed in fresh powder, visitors can see its geothermal display (and, if they’re lucky, a few curious bison) from the comfort of a toasty, rangerled snow coach. Yellowstone National Park; nps.gov The Sip-and-Ski A glass of a fine northern Michigan wine is the warmup for this brisk tasting tour; you’ll hit three local vineyards, all connected via cross-country trail. Leelanau County, Michigan; traverse city.com…

2 min.
the beauty of begonias

ONE OF MY REAL JOYS IN LIFE, other than my family, pets, and job, is my greenhouse and all the plants growing in it. Perhaps my favorites are the fancy-leaved begonias I have been amassing over the last 15 or so years. I clearly remember my maternal grandmother’s sun porch on Huntington Avenue in Buffalo, New York, where she puttered daily, caring for her large assortment of houseplants—deadheading spent blooms, cutting away withered leaves, and shaping leggy specimens into more manageable forms. She grew begonias, and loved showing me the different varieties of this expansive genus. I became enamored with the incredible textures and colors, and tried hard to remember the charact eristics of the various types: tuberous, rex, semperflorens, fibrous, and rhizomatous. The last were my favorites, and remain so…

1 min.
foliage in full

Begonia acetosa This Brazilian native has cupped, velvety green leaves that are vivid red underneath; it grows well on a sunny windowsill. Begonias dislike wet feet. Between waterings, let the soil dry out slightly. When the growing season begins in early spring, start feeding the plants with an organic 3-3-3 fertilizer. B. ‘Little Brother Montgomery’ Exploding with starburst-shaped maroon-and-silver foliage, it also features fragrant blooms when mature. B. ‘Selph’s Mahogany’ In winter, its large burgundygreen foliage erupts in a spray of delicate pink flowers. B. ‘Marmaduke’ Easy to cultivate, this rhizomatous type flaunts chartreuse maple-like leaves splattered with maroon. B. ‘Madame Queen’ A vigorous grower with large, ruffly leaves that resemble a flouncy skirt, it can reach 14 inches in height. B. x ’Fuscomaculata’ Spotted orangey-green leaves distinguish this rhizomatous type. Pinch back long stems during the growing season to encourage a…

5 min.
fold me now

FAMILY FUN Sweet Starts Valentine’s Day falls on a Wednesday this year, but don’t let that dampen the mood: These easy and thoughtful ideas will brighten a weekday breakfast. The night before, make the parfaits by layering jam, chopped pistachios, and yogurt in jars; cover and put them in the fridge. Then cut Xs, Os, and hearts out of parchment paper. In the morning, spread a few pieces of bread with butter, lay the st encils on top, sprinkle generously with cinnamon sugar, and pop them in the oven at 425° (just peel off the parchment afterward). Meanwhile, spoon warmed jam into a resealable plastic bag, snip a corner, and pipe out three dots on each yogurt. Drag a toothpick through them for the final flourish, and call everyone to the table…