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Midwest LivingMidwest Living

Midwest Living

May/June 2019

Midwest Living celebrates the unique and surprising Midwest region through its food, travel destinations, lifestyle, homes and gardens. Like visiting with a best friend, it unveils the authentic flavor of this region through inspiring photos, inside tips on best places to visit, and family-favorite recipes that simply taste great.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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editor’s note

If the Midwest had a regional flag, would we put a cabin on it? You could argue that this issue’s featured topic deserves that kind of credit. (Apologies to our friends at the Society to Promote Lighthouses and Barns.) Few icons top the cabin at representing the Midwest’s gumption and knack for balancing reinvention with roots. Do you like cabin classics? We know plenty of screen doors banging at vacation hideaways. Prefer an expectation-defying cabin? Let’s talk about twists such as tricked-out tree houses and adventure getaways inspired by Northwoods mines.Just as cabins keep pivoting for new eras, our cities and towns are booming with new faces, businesses and things to do. But there’s no mistaking that it’s still the same heart steadily beating under all the changes.(PHOTOGRAPH: KYLEE KRIZMANIC)We…

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midwestliving

TREVOR MEERSEditorial Content DirectorCREATIVE DIRECTOR KYLEE KRIZMANICDEPUTY EDITOR Hannah AgranTRAVEL EDITOR Timothy MeinchSENIOR STAFF WRITER Gary ThompsonDEPUTY ART DIRECTOR John MeekASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Allison ZelleSENIOR EDITOR, DIGITAL AND SPECIAL PROJECTS Ginger CrichtonCONTRIBUTING HOME EDITOR Kelly Ryan KegansCONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Diane PenningrothOFFICE MANAGER Karen SchirmART ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Brenda KienastTEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR Lynn BlanchardTEST KITCHEN PROJECT SUPERVISOR Juliana HaleCONTRIBUTORS Cindy Cates, Bri Harding, Jess Hoffert, Ruby Hotchkiss, Helen Karakoudas Lauren Kassien, Ann Hinga Klein, Jessie Spangler, Sandra ZelesCONTENT STUDIOEXECUTIVE EDITOR, CUSTOMS AND DIGITAL Beth EslingerDEPUTY EDITOR Mary BeaumontEDITORIAL CONTENT MANAGER Kristin BienertMARKETINGMARKETING DIRECTOR Christine O’ConnorSENIOR MARKETING MANAGER Darya SchwartzCREATIVE DIRECTOR Eileen KoehlerCONSUMER MARKETING MANAGER Graham WoodwardSALES AND MARKETING COORDINATOR Caroline MacomberRESEARCHRESEARCH DIRECTOR Diane TerwilligerSENIOR RESEARCH MANAGER Samantha PowersPRODUCTION AND FINANCEBUSINESS MANAGER Diane UmlandPRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kent PollpeterSENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER Michaela LesterPREPRESS DESKTOP SPECIALIST…

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earn your wings

up-size a bedButterflies zero in on large beds. This one includes ‘Northwind’ switchgrass, fountain grass and annual flowers.AT THE HEIGHT OF SUMMER, Nina and Ron Koziol’s 1-acre garden near Chicago is the O’Hare Airport of butterflies. Majestic monarchs taxi on runways of zinnias, Pentas, milkweed and asters. Super-size swallowtails circle fragrant purple butterfly bush blossoms. Smaller fliers like tortoiseshells, commas, sulphurs, checkerspots and crescents make repeated touch-and-go landings amid beds, borders and containers.To attract all the air traffic, Nina relies on blue and violet blooms—natural magnets for pollinators like butterflies that feed on flower nectar. Because most perennials bloom for only a month or so, she plants annuals in beds and pots to ensure color all summer. She also grows species-specific plants for female butterflies to lay their eggs on.…

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mint condition

This speedy sauce is good enough to eat with a spoon. Try it over fish, chicken or pasta—or just dip hunks of crusty bread in it as an appetizer.DO-ANYTHING SAUCETomato-Butter Pan Sauce with MintIn a medium saucepan, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add 2 cloves minced garlic and cook 1 minute, stirring frequently. Add 1 pint halved cherry tomatoes, ¼ cup chopped fresh mint, ¼ teaspoon salt and ⅛ teaspoon crushed red pepper. Reduce heat to medium-low. Cook, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes are very tender and breaking apart, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in 2 tablespoons butter until melted. Serve warm.SUMMER SIPPERApricot-Mint Iced TeaIn a large saucepan, bring 3 cups water to a boil. Remove from heat. Add 6 black tea bags and 8 mint sprigs;…

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come and go

We’ve packed lots of utility into this entryway. But one thing is pure fun—the framed paper below. Every few months, jot a new bucket list of activities your crew wants to accomplish that season. After all, this harried to-and-fro space in your home is also the one where every family adventure starts.tray chicUse trays or dishes to hold the small stuff that inevitably collects by doors—sunglasses, loose change, keys. Just as in the kitchen, allowing yourself one hide-everything drawer can be a blessing.TUNE INHover your phone’s camera to watch our makeover of this space.hats offCorral all the summer caps in a basket overhead. When fall comes, trade out the contents for a backup stash of warm hats and gloves (you can never have too many).safety firstKeep sunscreen, bug spray and…

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sand-tastic news

TALK ABOUT A LONG GAME: A century of local and national efforts paid off this year when a stretch of Lake Michigan shoreline just east of Chicago won the designation of Indiana Dunes National Park. Recognized since 1966 as a national lakeshore, the park joins the ranks of luminaries like Yellowstone and Yosemite, boosting the Great Lakes’ profile along the way.What’s to see here? Thousands of acres of wetlands, woodlands and prairies, plus dune-lined beaches. Botantical buffs should take special notice. The field of plant ecology began here in one of North America’s most biodiverse places. Watch for native plants, such as dainty marsh marigolds, downy milkweeds and the silvery (and threatened) Pitcher’s thistle.8 NATIONAL PARKS IN THE MIDWESTIndiana Dunes, IndianaIsle Royale, MichiganVoyageurs, MinnesotaGateway Arch, MissouriTheodore Roosevelt, North DakotaCuyahoga Valley,…

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