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Business & Finance
Money Magazine

Money Magazine

December 2020 / January 2021

Money magazine is Australia’s longest-running, highest-selling and most-read personal finance magazine. Money magazine provides credible, independent, easy-to-understand financial advice to help its readers save money and make the most of their investments.

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Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rainmaker Information Pty Limited
Frequency:
Monthly
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11 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
in a world of change, go for the best

Money magazine was launched in July 1999. To my adult kids’ amusement, I keep the first cover shot on my study wall, showing a much younger Paul Clitheroe. Not a trace of grey hair! The headline was “Shares – Getting it Right”. Mind you, if you invested back in 1999, it was pretty hard to get it wrong. CBA was around $9.50, BHP $11.50, Woolworths $5.50 and so on. Sure, there will always be a few bad performers in any portfolio, which is why at Money we always suggest you spread your risk by owning a number of companies, or invest via a fund, ETF or your super. But as history would lead you to expect, despite the GFC and now Covid-19, patient, diversified shareholders have been well rewarded with capital…

1 min.
topics that are well worth exploring

Firstly, thanks for such an informative magazine. I just have a couple of suggestions for future articles. 1. Rental property sales. There have been many articles on deductions for rental properties and all mention depreciation – such as building depreciation – but most neglect to mention that such deductions have to be considered when you sell the property and need to calculate capital gains. An article to address things that need to be included when working out capital gains (losses) would be useful so that appropriate records are kept. 2. Performance of portfolios. There are many published tables, articles and advertisements mentioning performance of shares, managed funds, trusts, exchange traded funds, etc. It would be useful to know how these are calculated so that individual investors can compare like with like. Are…

2 min.
keep saving

If I could rewind to the start of 2020, I would have said, hang on to your hats, it’s going to be a hellish ride ahead. But we survived. If you got through 2020 with your wallet intact, well done. If you had to turn your saving and spending habits upside down, we can relate – and we hope our featured articles in the past six issues, all devoted to swimming in unchartered waters, have helped you get there. Looking back, I am particularly grateful to our editorial team and contributors for finding us the answers to those important questions, including how to avail of government assistance if you’re a small business, how to invest if you’re starting from scratch, and how to handle those curly situations where family and finance…

2 min.
feedback

Support for mental illness I must admit I laughed when I read about the cost of mental ill health to the economy (November issue, page 12). As an unlucky working Aussie with a mental health diagnosis, I feel I must “apologise” for the $10 billion-$18 billion it is costing the Australian business sector! Speaking with the voice of those who work, invest, save and spend into the Australian economy, who just happen to have a health diagnosis in the mental health area, I would prefer our illness to be treated as just that, an illness that requires ease of access to sick leave and medical care. Our esteemed medical experts and scientists are successfully providing the latter. What the corporate and business sector can do is support the first aspect (sick leave, medical…

2 min.
what gifts will you be giving this festive season?

BOB CHRISTENSEN Bob, a senior sub-editor at Money, says: “Sorry kids, but this is going to be a low-frills, minimalist gift-giving festive season. Our family has been fortunate, but the terrible impact of the pandemic generally has reminded many of us that we have far too much unnecessary stuff in our lives, and that there is a big difference between needs and wants. Less is okay, even at Christmas!” SHARYN MCCOWEN Sharyn, our digital editor, says: “My nephews are old enough to read so if I don’t write LEGO, I’m in trouble. My dog is still learning to read but I can reveal that Santa is bringing her a new stash of Kong tennis balls, which endure better than most the affections of a real-life Bluey. As for my wonderful husband, we bought…

3 min.
focus on the big picture

And now, the end is near, and so we face the final curtain … apologies to Frank Sinatra. We’re nearing the end of 2020 – a year that presented us with some big challenges. But like anything else, it too will pass. When I reflect back, I can see that as difficult as it was, 2020 made me take stock of what I’m fortunate to have in my life: savings, investments, a job, friends and family. It got me thinking about my super, too. I remember back in March, when the market went down, the first thought that popped into my head was, “What’s happening to my super?” In fact, it had dropped more than 20%. Even though I knew it would rebound eventually, I was afraid it might fall further…