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Mother JonesMother Jones

Mother Jones May/June 2019

Mother Jones is a nonprofit news organization with a bi-monthly magazine that delivers bold and original reporting on the urgent issues of our day, from politics and climate change to education and the food we eat. We investigate stories that are in the public’s interest. From revelatory scoops to deep-dive investigations, Mother Jones journalism is award-winning storytelling that informs and inspires 10 million monthly readers.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Foundation For National Progress
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
contributors

In the last four years, senior reporter SHANE BAUER has worked undercover as a private prison guard in Louisiana, joined a right-wing border militia in Arizona, and, for this issue, sneaked into Syria to investigate American involvement in the crisis (“Behind the Lines”). Meanwhile, his 2018 book on for-profit incarceration, American Prison, made the New York Times Book Review’s year-end top-10 list. Photo and video journalist CHRISTIAN WERNER covers the Middle East, Africa, and Central America, often for Der Spiegel. He is used to dealing with Syrian government “minders” who keep tabs on reporters and their sources for the Ministry of Information. But after getting off the regime’s blacklist and returning to Syria, he was assigned some of its strictest escorts, he says: “Hellhounds without chains.” MoJo immigration reporter FERNANDA ECHAVARRI was…

access_time4 min.
into the line of fire

JAMES FOLEY, A 38-YEAR-OLD former prison literacy teacher, went to Syria in 2012 to cover a civil war in which the United States was a major player—and which Americans were largely ignoring. He believed in the power of witnessing, and in the human capacity for empathy. “Journalism in a war zone should not be just about conflict,” says Charles Sennott, a veteran foreign correspondent who was one of Foley’s editors. “He had the most extraordinary talent to tell the story of the people caught in the middle of it.” It’s an impulse that has always motivated journalists to head into the line of fire, from WWII Europe to Vietnam, Central America, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Foreign bureaus were a fixture even at regional papers like the Baltimore Sun and the Boston Globe.…

access_time8 min.
the real border emergency

JUAN WAS STANDING with his wife and three young kids, clenching a tiny piece of paper with a four-digit number written on it. “We didn’t make it today,” he said. He then rolled his suitcase away from the line of people that had formed against a wall in the shadow of an overpass in Tijuana, alongside giant letters spelling out “Mexico” right on the border. “We are seven numbers short.” That morning, about 50 lucky people ahead of him had their numbers called. Juan and his family, who are from El Salvador, had spent seven weeks in the city, sleeping in shelters, waiting like countless others for their lifeline to be called. If everything worked as promised and the next 50 numbers were called in order, tomorrow would be their day…

access_time7 min.
what's the best way to change an abuser?

IN A DRAB college classroom in Oakland, California, about a dozen men sit in a half-circle of desks, arranged in order of who’s been coming here the longest. The guy with 21 weeks under his belt sits farthest from the door while the guys with more than 40 weeks sit closest to it. “I thought it was your last week?” asks a man with about 30 weeks. “Nah, I decided to keep going,” responds one with 42 weeks. “I went too far to quit now.” Right at 6:30 p.m., the group’s most senior member, 46 weeks, walks in. Everyone calls out his name. Fist bumps follow. Joshua Ewing arrives shortly afterward. A 34-year-old covered in prison tattoos, Ewing first came to this classroom more than three years ago after he was convicted of punching…

access_time1 min.
toxic avengers

NAILING DOWN THE motive behind a mass shooting is often difficult. Shooters tend to be driven by a poisonous blend of entrenched grievances, personal setbacks, depression, rage, suicidal urges, and in some cases, serious behavioral disorders or mental illness. Rarely can their actions be explained definitively by a single factor. However, Mother Jones’ in-depth database of public mass shootings reveals a stark pattern of misogyny and domestic violence among many attackers. This link is already well known in cases where men gun down intimate partners and other family members in their homes. We found that in at least 22 mass shootings since 2011—more than a third of the public attacks in the past eight years—shooters reportedly had a history of domestic violence, specifically targeted women, or had stalked and harassed…

access_time6 min.
getting warmer

BLINK AND YOU would have missed the most substantial reference to climate change in the three 2016 presidential debates. “I think the science is real,” Hillary Clinton affirmed in her first showdown with Donald Trump, not because she was asked about it, but because she wanted to highlight yet another contrast between them. And that was the end of the matter. This was no surprise. Democratic candidates have typically treated climate change as just another talking point to breeze through before getting to their real policy priorities. Ever since a cap-and-trade bill flamed out on Capitol Hill a decade ago, the Democratic establishment has remained convinced that focusing too heavily on climate change is a losing strategy. But the 2020 race might be different. Liberal Democrats rank global warming and environmental protection…

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