AppleMagazine #501

AppleMagazine is a weekly publication jam-packed with breaking news, music, movies, TV shows, app reviews, and original content covering the latest goings-on in the world of Apple. AppleMagazine offers a new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading to your fingertips; with a global view of Apple and its influence on our lives - be it leisure, family or work. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, AppleMagazine will also keep you updated on the latest consumer-tech news. It's that simple! It’s all about Apple and its cultural influence, all in one place, and only one tap away. Subscribe to AppleMagazine today.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 3.99
USD 34.99
26 Números

en este número

5 min.
missing the moment: virtual reality’s breakout still elusive

Virtual reality — computer generated 3D environments that can range from startlingly realistic to abstract wonderlands — has been on the cusp of wide acceptance for years without ever really taking off. The pandemic should have been VR’s big moment, offering an escape for millions of locked-in households. Special headsets and gloves let people interact with a 360-degree, three-dimensional environment, seemingly a good fit for people stuck indoors. But consumers preferred simpler and more accessible tech like Zoom, Nintendo’s Switch and streaming services like Netflix. It’s the latest disappointment in an industry famous for stop-start progress. Patrick Susmilch, 33, an administrative assistant in Los Angeles, figured it was time for a VR headset after the lockdown began. He has a PlayStation and a Nintendo Switch and was spending about an hour and a…

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3 min.
huawei rolls out its own operating system to smartphones

Huawei launched its own HarmonyOS mobile operating system on its handsets on Wednesday as it adapts to having lost access to Google mobile services two years ago after the U.S. put the Chinese telecommunications company on a trade blacklist. The Shenzhen-based company announced that about 100 Huawei smartphone models will use its proprietary HarmonyOS system, and that the operating system will also be available on certain tablets and smart screens in the fourth quarter of the year. The launch of the operating system comes as the company is still cut off from American technologies including Google’s services and some computer chips to power its devices after the U.S. put it on an “entity list,” saying Huawei might aid China’s espionage efforts, an accusation the company vehemently denies. Huawei’s inclusion on the list restricts…

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2 min.
zoom’s boom continues in 1q, raising post-pandemic hopes

Zoom is still booming, raising prospects that the video-conferencing service will be able to sustain its momentum, even as the easing pandemic lessens the need for virtual meetings. Some signs for optimism emerged in the company’s latest quarterly earnings report released this week. That fueled a 3% gain in Zoom’s recently slumping stock to $338 after the numbers came out. Zoom CEO Eric Yuan sought to reassure Wall Street that the San Jose, California, company will still play a key role in an evolving environment that is expected to give workers more flexibility to split their time between the home and office. “Zoom is here to help each customer calibrate their future working model in their own way,” Yuan told analysts during a meeting hosted on the company’s service. “Many companies are redesigning…

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4 min.
can virtual reality help seniors? study hopes to find out

Terry Colli and three other residents of the John Knox Village senior community got a trip via computer to the International Space Station, a kickoff to a Stanford University study on whether virtual reality can improve the emotional wellbeing of older people. Donning 1-pound (470-gram) headsets with video and sound, the four could imagine floating weightless with astronauts and get a 360-degree tour of the station. In other programs, residents can take virtual visits to Paris, Venice, Egypt or elsewhere around the globe; attend a car rally, skydive or go on a hike. “I feel great. It is amazing. It is like you are really there,” said Colli, 73, and a former spokesman for the Canadian embassy in Washington. Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab will be working with John Knox’s 1,200 residents, who…

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8 min.
you’re invited: a new landscape with a cutting-edge app

For almost ten years, AppleMagazine has kept you abreast of the latest in the technology world. Today marks a new chapter. Introducing the AppleMagazine app for iOS, transforming the landscape, and offering exciting new ways to stay updated on the latest consumer-tech news. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, it’s now available on the Apple App Store. INTRODUCING THE APPLEMAGAZINE APP The chances are that AppleMagazine is not new to you - after all, you’re reading our 501th edition right now! For close to a decade, we’ve been at the cutting-edge of technology and entertainment journalism, keeping millions of readers up-to-date on the latest goings-on, not only from Apple, but other technology brands, as well as covering major industry stories like the Huawei ban, global chip shortage, and of course, the impact COVID-19…

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2 min.
automotive chip maker says it’s nearly recovered from blaze

A fire-damaged Japanese factory that supplies many of the auto industry’s computer chips is producing about 88% of what it was making before the March blaze, its owner says. Renesas Electronics Corp. said this week that replacements for fire-damaged equipment arrived on May 27, and should be running in mid-June. That would allow the company to return to full production. The March 19 Renesas fire and a worldwide shortage of computer chips have wreaked havoc on auto industry production schedules, forcing companies to cut production and allocate scarce chips to higher-margin models. The production cuts have crimped the supply of new vehicles just as demand recovers from the coronavirus pandemic, causing shortages and raising new vehicle prices. Used vehicle prices have hit record levels. Ford, for instance, said it the shortage would halve its…

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