Cine, TV y Música
BBC Music Magazine

BBC Music Magazine January 2018

BBC Music Magazine is a must for anyone with a passion for classical music. Classical music connoisseurs and new enthusiast alike will enjoy the fascinating features and reviews of over 120 new works in every issue. Please Note: Our digital edition does not include the cover mount items or supplements you would normally find with printed copies

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
Periodicidad:
Monthly
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13 Números

en este número

1 min.
this month’s contributors

Humphrey Burton Author and broadcaster ‘A prized possession of mine is an album of three 78s: Bernstein playing Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G in 1946. The filler side features two Anniversaries, a striking taste of Lenny’s late-night personal world.’ Page 26 Paul Spicer Conductor and author ‘One of my motivations as a conductor is searching out repertoire that few people perform today. This is especially true in my specialist area of 20th-century British choral music.’ Page 44 Claire Jackson Music journalist ‘The story of the Mary Rose is one of suffering, intrigue – and serendipity: its unique collection of artefacts reveals much about Tudor music. It was a pleasure to visit the ship in her new Portsmouth home.’ Page 54…

1 min.
welcome

Classical music doesn’t always get gender equality right – the acceptance of female conductors into the performing mainstream, for example, has been slow and arduous (and still is). Mind you, when you’ve got friends such as those on p17 (see Déjà Vu), who needs enemies? But the British Composer Awards (see p12) are happily leading the way. For the first time in the Awards’ history, there are more women prize-winners than men, a far cry from 2013 when men scooped all 13 on offer. It’s easy to suspect that this year’s awards are the result of BASCA, the foundation behind them, purposefully redressing the balance, but that’s simply not true. A couple of changes to procedure have been made in recent years that have helped democratise things considerably. Firstly, composers are…

1 min.
letter of the month

Kiri’s last stand I was intrigued by a phrase in your news piece on Dame Kiri Te Kanawa’s retirement (November), namely ‘She had previously waved goodbye to the opera stage – one speaking part notwithstanding – …in 2010.’ I presume this unnamed role was the relatively minor but essential (to the plot) Duchesse de Crakentorp in Donizetti’s La fille du régiment. I attended a performance of this at the Vienna State Opera in October 2013 with Dame Kiri in that role and will always remember it for two reasons. Firstly, as soon as Dame Kiri appeared onstage in Act II, one highly exited and clearly emotional voice cried out ‘Ki-ri’ (with the emphasis on the second syllable – he sounded Italian!). The audience broke into laughter before the show could proceed.…

4 min.
have your say…

Hands-on Hans Further to your Timepiece article (Christmas) on Wagner’s Siegfried Idyll, the conductor Hans Richter not only played trumpet for the Christmas morning performance (a whole 13 bars), but he also filled in second viola near the end. Standing halfway up the stairs, he also relayed Wagner’s beat to those players further down who could not see Wagner conducting. Richter had learnt the trumpet especially for this occasion – his main instrument was the French horn. Elgar paid tribute to Richter’s horn skills in both his symphonies, which have virtuoso parts for the horn section – his First Symphony is dedicated to Richter and the Second contains in its finale a theme labelled ‘Hans himself!’ in Elgar’s sketches. Duncan Eves, Winchester Meaty thoughts I absolutely loved the advertisement for Liebig’s meat extract, depicting…

1 min.
social gathering

Following last issue’s ‘The 12 drinks of Christmas’ feature, we have been asking you online which classical music and drinks go well with each other. I’d go for Sibelius’s Finlandia & lingonberry vodka. I think it would invoke the essence of far northern expanses. Alice Stainer @AliceStainer Satie’s Gymnopédie No. 1 with a Boulard XO Auguste Calvados. He lived in Honfleur near the distillery and both the piece and spirit are warming. Lyle Bignon Juan Diego Flórez singing his 9 high Cs in ‘Ah mes Amis’ in Donizetti’s La fille du régiment with champagne. As he said himself – it’s a champagne aria! Jacky Tarleton @JackyTarleton Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture with Tobermory 15-year-old Scotch. The composer sketched out the idea for the overture in Tobermory, Isle of Mull, on 7 August 1829. Garth Pauley Ysaÿe’s Sonates pour violon solo performed…

3 min.
triumphs for female composers

For the first time in its history, more prizes at the British Composer Awards have gone to women than to men. Nine of this year’s 13 awards went to female composers at the ceremony at the British Museum. In one major category, Orchestral, all three short-listed nominations were by women composers. Asked about how she felt about being the winner of a category of which the shortlist was entirely women, Emily Howard told BBC Music Magazine: ‘When I saw the shortlist, I thought “actually that is really cool!”. It’s a different place from ten years ago when I was often asked “What is it like to be a female composer?” It’s like the question is no longer there.’ Howard’s concerto for orchestra, Torus, was co-commissioned by BBC Radio 3 and the…