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BBC Music MagazineBBC Music Magazine

BBC Music Magazine April 2019

BBC Music Magazine is a must for anyone with a passion for classical music. Classical music connoisseurs and new enthusiast alike will enjoy the fascinating features and reviews of over 120 new works in every issue. Please Note: Our digital edition does not include the cover mount items or supplements you would normally find with printed copies

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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this month’s contributors

Michael White Writer and critic ‘My idea of paradise would be the opening weekend of the Aldeburgh Festival in perpetuity – but it wouldn’t work in perpetuity because by definition festivals are something that you can’t have every day.’ Page 26 Lucie Skeaping Presenter, BBC Radio 3 ‘Purcell lived in one of the world’s most exciting cities, in one of the most remarkable periods of English history; and what a variety of music he left us before, all too soon, he was “laid in earth…”’ Page 114 Mervyn Cooke Writer and academic ‘Exploring Gershwin’s Piano Concerto is a great introduction to the exciting creative tensions in American music in the 1920s: jazz and Romanticism fused in a heady mix that was highly provocative for its time.’ Page 118…

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welcome

News of André Previn’s death broke the evening we went to press with this issue. Previn was the most incandescent of musical stars – a musician whose prodigious talent touched just about every genre: a brilliant jazz pianist in the mould of Oscar Peterson; an Oscar-winning film score composer; a classical pianist of exceptional skill; a conductor whose repertoire expertise knew no bounds (he was a fervent champion of British 20th-century music, for instance). And that’s not even mentioning his extraordinary flair for communication. Coincidentally, Previn features this month as our Building a Library choice for his blistering performance, as pianist and conductor, of Gershwin’s Piano Concerto (p118). There’s a Previn link in our celebration of film themes, too (p50) – our online poll with RadioTimes.com in February crowned John…

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letter of the month

Heavenly Bruckner In response to your excellent Timepiece article on Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony (February issue), there is, I think, a school of thought that argues that the Adagio third movement is the most suitable ending. He sketched out a ‘proper’ final movement, but he was never the most confident at breaking the rigid four-movement structure. He was constantly dismayed at criticism from the establishment – witness the withdrawal of the symphony ‘0’ and the rewrites of Symphonies Nos 3, 4 and 5. And we shall never understand Bruckner without a recognition and respect for the fact that his faith was the wellspring of his inspiration – he declared once that when he was called to judgement by his Maker, and was asked what he had done with his life, he would…

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have your say…

Making the grade Music exams (Grade Britain, February) have been a big part of my life for over 50 years, both as a pupil and more often as a teacher and accompanist. Examiners have a very difficult task. They are human and are also excellent musicians with a deep love of the art. They hear all sorts of things but cannot react as they would often like. On one occasion, I was playing for one of my Grade 5 singing pupils. After a difficult start, she had made amazing progress. And following A Nightingale sang in Berkeley Square the examiner told us that her performance was wonderful and had made his whole week. Unprofessional, I know, but we were very happy! Philip Chant, Monmouth That human touch I started getting into classical music a…

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jess gillam joins presenter line-up at radio 3

Jess Gillam is set to become the youngest ever presenter on BBC Radio 3. As part of a wave of new programmes, the saxophonist and former BBC Young Musician finalist, 20, will present a new weekly Saturday show entitled This Classical Life. On it, she’ll be joined by other young musicians to discuss their favourite works and new musical discoveries, as well as their views on the music industry as performers. Confirmed guests include pianist Isata Kanneh-Mason, pianist and sound artist Belle Chen and film and TV composer Ollie Howell, as well as double bassist Sam Becker, with whom Gillam presented the BBC Young Musician podcast last year. The first episode of This Classical Life will air on Radio 3 on 6 April, and will also be available in podcast form…

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midori’s musical message to the pope

Pope Francis was treated to a little Bach when he attended the recent United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development meeting in Rome. It came courtesy of Midori, who played the Prelude from the Partita No. 3. The violinist was not just there to serenade the ears of His Holiness, however. In a subsequent speech, Midori, who has been an official United Nations Messenger of Peace since 2007, called on the conference to support the empowerment of women and girls in remote rural communities by giving them access to education and technology. Talking about a visit she made to Vietnam last year, Midori explained that ‘By talking with the women [there], I learned that development isn’t just about financial gain; it’s about seeing a future. It is a very powerful…

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