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Billboard MagazineBillboard Magazine

Billboard Magazine

November 16, 2019

Written for music industry professionals and fans. Contents provide news, reviews and statistics for all genres of music, including radio play, music video, related internet activity and retail updates.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Prometheus Global Media
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29 Números

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maroon 5’s 15 years of ‘memories’

MAROON 5 EARNS ITS 15TH BILLBOARD HOT 100 TOP 10 — OVER 15 years after its first such hit. “Memories” ascends 11-9 on the chart, with 57.7 million in airplay audience, 16.6 million U.S. streams and 18,000 sold in the tracking week, according to Nielsen Music. The Adam Levine-led band first appeared in the top tier with “This Love,” which reached No. 5 in April 2004. The act’s sum of 15 top 10s marks the most among groups or duos since then, ahead of runners-up The Black Eyed Peas, with nine. Next up in the category during that stretch: One Direction (six) and The Chainsmokers (five). “Memories” concurrently becomes Maroon 5’s record-extending 22nd top five hit on the Adult Top 40 airplay chart and its 21st top 10 on Mainstream Top 40, the…

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billboard 200

Lambert Gets Dealt A Good Hand Miranda Lambert lands her sixth straight Billboard 200 top 10 as her latest effort, Wildcard, bows at No. 4 with 53,000 equivalent album units earned in the week ending Nov. 7, according to Nielsen Music. On Top Country Albums, Wildcard is Lambert’s seventh total and consecutive No. 1 — her entire chart output. She matches Carrie Underwood as the only artists in the list’s 55-year history to rule in seven career-opening appearances. In more country news, Luke Combs’ What You See Is What You Get is set to bow at No. 1 on the Nov. 23-dated Billboard 200 and Top Country Albums charts with 175,000-plus units earned in the week ending Nov. 14, according to industry forecasters. The album’s tracks may log over 75 million on-demand audio…

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billboard

HANNAH KARP EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ROBERT LEVINE INDUSTRY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR IAN DREW CONSUMER EDITORIAL DIRECTOR FRANK DIGIACOMO EXECUTIVE EDITOR, INVESTIGATION ENTERPRISE SILVIO PIETROLUONGO SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHARTS AND DATA DEVELOPMENT DENISE WARNER EXECUTIVE EDITOR, DIGITAL CHRISTINE WERTHMAN MANAGING EDITOR JENNIFER MARTIN LASKI EXECUTIVE PHOTO AND VIDEO DIRECTOR ALEXIS COOK CREATIVE DIRECTOR MELINDA NEWMAN EXECUTIVE EDITOR, WEST COAST/NASHVILLE LEILA COBO VICE PRESIDENT/LATIN INDUSTRY LEAD GAIL MITCHELL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, R&B/HIP-HOP THOM DUFFY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, POWER LISTS JASON LIPSHUTZ SENIOR DIRECTOR, MUSIC REBECCA MILZOFF FEATURES EDITOR EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITORS Colin Stutz (Industry News), Sarah Grant (The Market), Lyndsey Havens (The Sound), Nolan Feeney (Features), Danica Daniel (The Players) INTERNATIONAL EDITOR Alexei Barrionuevo • AWARDS EDITOR Paul Grein SENIOR DIRECTOR Dave Brooks (Touring/Live Entertainment) • LEAD ANALYST Glenn Peoples • SENIOR EDITOR/ANALYST Ed Christman (Publishing/Retail) • SENIOR WRITER Dan Rys SENIOR CORRESPONDENT Claudia Rosenbaum • COUNTRY CORRESPONDENT Annie Reuter • EDITORS AT LARGE Steve…

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why artists are giving fans their digits

AS ONEREPUBLIC TOOK the stage at the Red Rocks Amphitheatre outside of Denver, giant monitors displayed what appeared to some fans to be too good to be true: a phone number for the band. “Hey it’s OneRepublic!” read the message sent to roughly 2,000 fans who tried texting the number that night in the sold-out, 9,500-seat venue. “This is an autotext to let you know we got your text. From now on it will be us. Make sure you click the link and add yourself to our contacts so we can text you back.” As a result, the band racked up contact information and locations for most of those attendees, to whom it can now sell concert tickets, merchandise and music directly by sending text messages to the specific groups — or…

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the future is ozuna

UNTIL NOW, LATIN artists with joint record deals were the norm. If an act with mainstream potential was signed to a regional Latin label, it would almost always sign a separate deal with a major in order to release its album in English — even if that label was a corporate cousin of the same conglomerate. But Ozuna, the smooth-voiced reggaetonero from Puerto Rico, is the first major Latin artist to pursue a different strategy in Anglo markets — and he won’t be the last. In yet another example of the growing importance of the Latin market, Sony Music Entertainment signed the 27-year-old star in an eight-figure agreement that sources with knowledge of the matter say is the largest record deal for a Latin artist in history. The agreement includes multiple…

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the rock hall’s next move

STEVE MILLER CALLED it a “private boys’ club.” Women Who Rock: Bessie to Beyoncé. Girl Groups to Riot Grrrl. editor Evelyn McDonnell accused it of “the manhandling of rock’n’roll history.” And a critic for The Guardian said it should be “put out of its misery.” Such is the reputation of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. But John Sykes, the Hall Foundation’s new chairman as of Jan. 1, 2020, says he plans to expand the foundation’s board “to better reflect the nominees we’re inducting.” Sykes, iHeartMedia’s president of entertainment enterprises, says he has invited two new people already to join a board that includes industry heavyweights like Eagles manager Irving Azoff, Live Nation Entertainment president/CEO Michael Rapino and Sony Music Entertainment CEO Rob Stringer. He’s taking over a Hall of Fame that…

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