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Landscape Architecture AustraliaLandscape Architecture Australia

Landscape Architecture Australia

Issue 162 May 2019

Landscape Architecture Australia is an authoritative and contemporary record of landscape architecture, urban design and land-use planning in Australia, presenting independent reviews of public, commercial and residential work, plus commissioned comment on contemporary issues. The official magazine partner of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects.

País:
Australia
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Architecture Media Pty Ltd
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contributors

Jacky BowringJacky Bowring is professor of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University. She has written books on memory, emotion and landscape and is the editor of the Landscape Review.Catherin BullCatherin Bull AM is emeritus professor of landscape architecture at the University of Melbourne and adjunct professor at Queensland University of Technology.Julian BullJulian Bull is a registered landscape architect and ecologist.Tim EdensorTim Edensor is a research fellow in geography at the University of Melbourne. He is currently working on a book about Melbourne’s relationship with stone.Jock GilbertJock Gilbert is a registered landscape architect and lecturer in RMIT University’s School of Architecture and Urban Design.Sarah HicksSarah Hicks is a landscape architect and artist, and a director of Bush Projects Landscape Architecture and Art based in Melbourne and regional Victoria. She teaches sessionally at…

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landscape architecture australia

EDITOREMILY WONGEDITORIAL ENQUIRIEST +61 3 8699 1000E LANDSCAPE@ARCHMEDIA.COM.AUEDITORIAL DIRECTORKATELIN BUTLEREDITORIAL TEAMMARY MANN, CASSIE HANSEN, JOSH HARRIS, ALEXA KEMPTONCONTRIBUTING EDITORSTIM FITZGERALD, LEANNE HODYL, CLAIRE MARTIN, DAN YOUNG, HOWARD TANNER, CATHERIN BULL, RHYS WILLIAMS, VANESSA MARGETTSPRODUCTIONSIMONE WALLGRAPHIC DESIGNGORAN RUPENAMANAGING DIRECTORIAN CLOSEPUBLISHERSUE HARRISGENERAL MANAGER, EVENTS AND ADMINISTRATIONJACINTA REEDYADVERTISING SALES ACCOUNT MANAGERSAMY BANKS, BELINDA DOBELSKY, TASH FISHER, LANA GOLUBINSKY, VICTORIA HAWTHORNE, LINDY LEAN.ADVERTISING ENQUIRIESADVERTISING@ARCHMEDIA.COM.AUT +61 3 8699 1000WA ONLY OKEEFFE MEDIA WA LICIA SALOMONET +61 412 080 600PRINT MANAGEMENTDAI PRINTDISTRIBUTIONAUSTRALIA: GORDON & GOTCHAUSTRALIA (BOOKSHOPS)SUBSCRIPTIONSFOUR ISSUES PER YEAR (AUD)AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND$53 AUD ($102 – 2 YEARS)OVERSEAS (AIR)$88 AUD ($171 – 2 YEARS)DIGITAL$38 AUDW ARCHITECTUREMEDIA.COM/STOREE SUBSCRIBE@ARCHMEDIA.COM.AUPUBLISHED IN FEBRUARY, MAY, AUGUST & NOVEMBERPUBLISHED AND OWNED BYARCHITECTURE MEDIA PTY LTD ACN 008 626 686LEVEL 6, 163 EASTERN ROADSOUTH MELBOURNE VIC 3205T +61 3 8699 1000F +61 3 9696 2617E…

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perspective

Follow us@landscapeauLike usfacebook.com/landscapeauFollow us@landscapeauVisit usLandscapeAustralia.comWe’re excited to welcome our keynote speakers to Melbourne on 11 May for the Landscape Australia Conference. We’re anticipating much debate unfolding over the course of the event, which we hope will spur further conversation into the emerging possibilities of landscape practice within Australia and beyond.Our excitement has spilled onto the pages of this issue. On the cover we feature Crafted Land in Bangkok, Thailand – a project by Sanitas Pradittasnee, one of our 2019 Landscape Australia Conference keynote speakers. Pradittasnee, founder of Bangkok-based Sanitas Studio, works in the crossover between art and landscape architecture, creating designs that provoke wonder and curiosity, and offer the chance for solo reflection. The particularly evocative work highlighted by our cover image (and discussed further in our interview on page…

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noticeboard

NEW PRECINCT FOR BOTANIC GARDENSThe Victorian Government has committed $5 million to begin work on the planning and design of a new nature and science precinct at Melbourne’s Royal Botanic Gardens. The plans include the restoration and expansion of the National Herbarium of Victoria, built in 1934, to include a plant identification service; the expansion of the existing children’s garden; and the return of the Great Melbourne Telescope to the Melbourne Observatory. The funding will be used for a feasibility study that will establish the project’s scope and design.Image: Guilfoyle’s Volcano at the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne designed by Andrew Laidlaw. Image: Katie O’Brienrbg.vic.gov.au | premier.vic.gov.auLAND ART GENERATOR 2019 OPENSThe 2019 edition of the Land Art Generator Initiative calls for landscape architects, artists and creative minds worldwide to submit proposals…

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the landscape of country

For Aboriginal people, Country differs from the concepts of landscape or space in that it is inseparable from both notions of the human world and the environment. Australian ethnographer Deborah Bird Rose has described Country as “a living entity with a yesterday, today and tomorrow, with a consciousness, anda will toward life… Country is not a generalised or undifferentiated type of place,” something ‘over there’ to be drawn or operated on. Rather, it is a concept in which the “values of life are pre-given…” And in the words of place-based learning scholar Margaret Somerville: “Country is not place, but nor is it nature or environment. There is no separation of human activity and the natural world… Country never loses the sense that the original creation story is still always there,…

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doubleground

02 Zigzagging walls abstract the triangulated forms of the gallery’s facade and offer an alternative spatial experience of one of the building’s distinctive visual elements.Doubleground Melbourne, VictoriaMuir and OpenworkAs you emerge from Melbourne’s National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) and enter the courtyard, it’s unclear where Doubleground, the 2018 NGV Architecture Commission by Muir and Openwork begins or ends. Its presence is transformative, yet also embedded within the Grollo Equiset Garden – there’s an underlying sense that it could have always been there. A field of yarrow and strawflower sways at eye level, and emerging from a sharp, tilted embankment, kangaroo paw hovers over an understorey of native and exotic species. The blooms serve as a beacon that draws visitors (both human and a variety of birds and insects) toward the…

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