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Maximum PCMaximum PC

Maximum PC January 2018

Maximum PC is the magazine that every computer geek, PC gamer, or content creator should read every month. Get Maximum PC digital magazine subscription today for punishing product reviews, thorough how-to articles, and the illuminating technical news and information that PC power users crave. Maximum PC covers every single topic that requires a lightning-fast PC, from video editing and music creation to PC gaming; we write about it all with unbounded enthusiasm for our collective hobby.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Limited US
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13 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

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the unquenchable thirst for hardware

a thing or two about a thing or two I AM A SELF-ADMITTED hardware addict. I love hardware. I obsess over hardware, and I’m always chasing the cutting edge. I’m also an early adopter, and that can be a problem at times. Some things just don’t work the way they’re supposed to when they’re new. For the most part, I haven’t had too many issues with being on the edge. There have been times when I’ve tried to convince myself to slow down. “There’s no need to keep upgrading,” I told myself. The self-hypnosis doesn’t seem very effective. What we’ve done this issue is put together a list of the very best gear of the year. Only products we think are badass make it on to this coveted list—the kind of gear…

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wpa2 cracked with krack

the beginning of the magazine, where the articles are small “A successful attack would enable decryption of all data you send over a connection. WI-FI PROTECTED Access 2 (WPA2), the encryption protocol used on the majority of Wi-Fi connections, has a major problem: Researchers from the University of Leuven in Belgium have published details on the so-called Key Reinstallation Attack—or Krack, for short— which breaks the encryption wide open. The problem is fundamental to the protocol, rather than any implementation of it, so everything using WPA2 is at risk, which is millions upon millions of devices WPA2 uses a nonce, an arbitrary number made for the process, during the initial handshake between devices, during which the encryption key is generated for all subsequent traffic. Frequent reconnections are anticipated with Wi-Fi, and the same…

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pcie doubles once again

THE FINAL SPECIFICATIONS for version 4.0 of PCI Express have been released, and once more we’re treated to a doubling of bandwidth. PCIe 4.0 runs at a base speed of 16GT/s. This translates to a little under 2GB/s per lane, so your x16 graphics card will get a healthy 31.51GB/s of bandwidth to play around with. As ever, it’s fully backward compatible. This has been a long time in the making; it was first announced in 2011. Faster is better, of course. NVMe cards and RAID systems will be happy, but most current hardware is comfortable with PCIe 3.0—it takes some serious gear to hit the buffers. Initially of more use is that you can halve the number of lanes for the same performance, saving those precious lanes for where you…

access_time1 min.
facebook is not spying on you

FACEBOOK HAS PUBLICLY denied that it is spying on us by secretly listening through our cell phone’s microphone in order to better target advertisements. This follows months of rumors that this is exactly what it’s doing. The rumor is born out of Facebook’s almost uncannily accurate targeting. This was helped along by some seemingly convincing viral videos of people testing the theory out by talking about a previously untouched subject, only to see ads pop up for it later. Spooky stuff. Official denials on shady behavior from large corporations are never very convincing. The fact that they have to be made at all is worrying. However, it may be worth mentioning the frequency illusion at this point: The ads were there all the time, but you just didn’t notice them…

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microsoft to save the headphone jack?

WHEN APPLE DECIDED that the 3.5mm headphone jack just wasn’t cool enough, and dropped it, there was some consternation. Apparently, even at that size, it took up too much room, and wasn’t suitable for super-skinny hardware. Other makers soon followed, and it looked as though it was going to be “legacy” time. Now it appears the old dog may have a savior. Microsoft has been granted a patent on new forms of the socket, which can be used in devices thinner than the plug itself. There are three designs; all use a variation on an expanding socket, so part of the jack can project beyond the device. Simple and easy enough to engineer. Microsoft itself probably won’t be making use of the idea, though, as it has killed off the…

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tech triumphs and tragedies

TRIUMPHS SUPER SUPERCOMPUTER The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is building the world’s most powerful computer, Summit, ready for 2019. MACHINE IMAGES Nvidia has released computergenerated images of faces using machine learning, which are getting close to realistic. INTEL TO GO NEURAL By the end of the year we’ll see the first Nervana Neural Networking chips for machine learning and AI. TRAGEDIES MICROSOFT KINECT DIES It was the fastest-selling consumer device of 2011, but the shine has faded, and production has been stopped. HUGE MALAYSIAN HACK Almost the entire population of Malaysia has had its personal data stolen, and offered for sale. GOOGLE DOCS LOCK It accidentally locked out people from their documents after a reading algorithm mistakenly flagged content as inappropriate.…

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