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Maximum PCMaximum PC

Maximum PC March 2017

Maximum PC is the magazine that every computer geek, PC gamer, or content creator should read every month. Get Maximum PC digital magazine subscription today for punishing product reviews, thorough how-to articles, and the illuminating technical news and information that PC power users crave. Maximum PC covers every single topic that requires a lightning-fast PC, from video editing and music creation to PC gaming; we write about it all with unbounded enthusiasm for our collective hobby.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Limited US
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13 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

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the true test of a skillful pc builder

Within the walls of our office, people often say “go big or go home” when it comes to building a system. Multiple graphics cards, unnecessary amounts of memory, and irresponsible volumes of storage space. And while it’s fun and entertaining to build monster systems, there are times when a compact, practical, and affordable system can equally be a beast in a different manner. Within the walls of our office, people often say “go big or go home” when it comes to building a system. Multiple graphics cards, unnecessary amounts of memory, and irresponsible volumes of storage space. And while it’s fun and entertaining to build monster systems, there are times when a compact, practical, and affordable system can equally be a beast in a different manner. When money’s no object, things actually…

access_time7 min.
the news

Ryzen: The First AMD Zen Chip Is AMD finally going to get its competitive edge back? This is an important release for AMD. Yes, every processor launch is important, but AMD’s Ryzen chip is the first to feature its Zen core architecture. This is AMD’s first serious assault on the high-end and enthusiast market for five years, and there is an awful lot riding on its success. Ryzen is an eightcore barnstormer, built using a 14nm production process. Intel chips have been top dog in serious machines for a while now—AMD fanboys will tell you how AMD chips can run faster, but it always seems to require a specific set of circumstances to achieve the trick. Ryzen looks to have the raw power to tackle Intel’s finest across the board. The Zen core…

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looking forward to amd’s vega gpu

Along with working silicon, AMD provided the first official details on Vega, and it’s shaping up to be (ahem) out of this world. It builds on everything that makes Polaris great, but it’s not simply a bigger chip with more cores. AMD didn’t provide Vega’s core count or clock speed, but it will likely be 4,096 cores clocked at around 1.5–1.6GHz. The reason we can be so specific is that AMD also announced a new line of machine intelligence accelerators, called Radeon Instinct MI6, MI8, and MI25. The MI25 uses Vega, and will provide up to 25 TFLOPS (with FP16—half that for FP32), which means Vega should be 45 percent faster in gaming performance than the Fury X. But it’s not just about TFLOPS. AMD has reworked several elements of its…

access_time3 min.
open source the next big linux fight is flatpak vs. snaps

The problem is, Canonical said the same thing with Snaps when it released Ubuntu 16.04 in April 2016. So what gives? First, it helps to know what exactly these new formats look to accomplish. The “purest” way to get software on a Linux system is to compile it from source. But compiling from source is a huge pain in the butt, and takes time. Which is why most people prefer to download packages. Packages have all of the program’s files in a single file, while a package manager reads, extracts, and performs any set-up operations that are needed (such as installing dependencies first). Not everyone agrees with where the files should go, which is why each Linux distribution does things differently. (The package manager and the choice of what packages to…

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the list

1STEELS ERIES RIVAL 700 ($100) Ergonomically perfect, together with haptic feedback, an OLED screen, and all the RGB lighting you could want, the Rival 700 decimates this list. 2LOGITECH PROTEUS SPECTRUM ($80) An outlandish design combined with an unlockable scroll wheel, weight adjustment, and even more lights means the Proteus Spectrum is one appealing finger-pointer. 3CORSAIR M65 PRO ($60) The combination of a soft-touch finish, sand-blasted plastic and aluminum chassis, and dependable lighting makes the M65 Proone of the most enjoyable mice to use. 4LOGITECH G900 CHAOS SPECTRUM ($123) Combine the brilliance of the Proteus with wireless tech and a new ambidextrous design, and you’re left with the Chaos Spectrum. If only it weren’t so pricey.… 5MIONIX NAOS QG ($130) With clever sensors that can tell you if you’re dying in the middle of a pixel firefight, the Naos…

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head to head

Firefox vs. Chrome vs. Edge Most of us use the humble web browser more than any other program. These ubiquitous apps act as portals to the Internet, and because we use them daily, we want them to be reliable and easy to use, as well as secure. By far the most popular browsers on Windows are Chrome (with 57.1 percent of the market in November 2016) and Firefox (with 11.1 percent). Microsoft’s Internet Explorer has fallen from grace, but the software giant is pushing its new browser, Edge, in Windows 10, in a bid to gain its lost market share. There are other browsers, such as Opera, but we’re looking at the three major players, to see which is best. ROUND 1 Performance We want a number of things in a web browser. First,…

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