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Maximum PCMaximum PC

Maximum PC May 2017

Maximum PC is the magazine that every computer geek, PC gamer, or content creator should read every month. Get Maximum PC digital magazine subscription today for punishing product reviews, thorough how-to articles, and the illuminating technical news and information that PC power users crave. Maximum PC covers every single topic that requires a lightning-fast PC, from video editing and music creation to PC gaming; we write about it all with unbounded enthusiasm for our collective hobby.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Limited US
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13 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time2 min.
welcome to the new amd

a thing or two about a thing or two BACK WHEN I WAS STILL IN SCHOOL, the PC landscape was largely dominated by Intel. There were more than just two players at that point. For example, does anyone remember Cyrix? AMD, too, was a secondary option. Every available alternative was essentially a licensed or reverse engineered version of an Intel CPU. And while some non-Intel CPUs offered unique features, most if not all of them were plagued by underperforming chipsets and lackluster motherboards. Sure, options were plentiful, but they were all third-rate choices, and the market was hungry for more. AMD—seemingly out of nowhere— delivered the equivalent of an atomic explosion to the market when it released the Athlon CPU. With the K6 series processor behind it, offering unexciting performance, the new…

access_time3 min.
ryzen family grows bigger

the beginning of the magazine, where the articles are small WE’VE HAD A WHILE to evaluate AMD’s Ryzen 7, and some have been a little harsh; expecting it to beat the best gaming processor ever at its first attempt is asking a lot. Game optimization for Ryzen has barely started, either. It’s about performance for the price, and here it hasn’t disappointed. AMD has now expanded the range with the Ryzen 5. Initially, we have four versions. The 3.2GHz 1600 and 3.6GHz 1600X have six cores and 16MB cache, while the 3.5GHz 1500X and the 3.2GHz 1400 make do with four cores and 8MB of cache. Initial prices run from just $169 for the 1400 to $249 for a 1600X. We also get snazzy new coolers: the Wraith Spire and Stealth. The…

access_time1 min.
switch a hit

HOPES FOR NINTENDO’S little games console weren’t high in all quarters during its protracted development. It missed key deadlines and was subject to much rumor and speculation, and did we really need a hybrid console and handheld anyway? However, sales have been decidedly brisk—1.5 million were shifted during the first week. Nintendo had planned to ship eight million in the first year, but has revised this to 16 million. That puts it in line to outsell the Wii U in under a year. Nintendo is not the force it once was in consoles, and has been left struggling against the Xbox and PlayStation in recent years. The Wii U didn’t shift in the numbers it needed, and developers’ attention started to wander. The initial game releases for the Switch were criticized…

access_time1 min.
windows updates blocked by chips

IF YOU’VE BUILT a lovely new Ryzen or Kaby Lake system, and stuck with Windows 7 or 8, there’s a catch. According to a Microsoft Knowledge Base article, Windows Update now informs you that you have unsupported hardware when you try to update. The solution, naturally, is an upgrade to Windows 10. The cited reason is Microsoft’s “support policy.” We knew this was coming—last year, Microsoft said that Windows 10 would be the only platform to support Kaby Lake, Qualcomm 8996, and AMD Bristol Ridge. Not many people will be running the latest chips alongside older versions of Windows, so adding support would be unprofitable. But cutting off all updates does look mean-spirited. Older versions of Windows run perfectly well on new silicon; there’s no technical problem. This move leaves you out…

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creator of the web speaks

ON THE 28TH ANNIVERSARY of the paper that started it all, Tim Berners-Lee issued a warning against what he sees as the biggest problems facing the web through the World Wide Web Foundation. He highlighted three problems: that we have lost control of our personal data, the rapid distribution of misinformation, and the lack of transparency in political advertising. Smart algorithms mean we are often served carefully targeted information. Articles designed to shock, interest, or appeal to our bias are quickly spread, along with disguised political advertising. What can be done is a tough one. The gathering of our online data has been a fundamental part of the commercial Internet for years. People still share huge amounts of personal data with little thought of consequences. The increasing use of this data for…

access_time1 min.
tech triumphs and tragedies

TRIUMPHS ELECTRIC TATTOO The use of a new electrically conductive tattoo ink means you can embed circuits into your body. FACEZAM WAS A HOAX No, you can’t get somebody’s Facebook profile from a picture of them—a hoax disturbingly close to reality for many. WINDOWS INTO CHINA A version of Win 10 that meets Chinese government approval is ready for market, but the exact modifications remain a mystery. TRAGEDIES GOOGLE AD ROW SPREADS Four big brands have withdrawn non-search ads from Google after their ads were placed next to extremist videos on YouTube. PHONE BATH WARNING A coroner has called for warnings on iPhones after a man electrocuted himself using his phone in the bath. GIF WEAPONIZED A Texas court has classed a gif as a deadly weapon after an epileptic was maliciously sent a flashing image.…

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