EXPLORARMI BIBLIOTECA
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Tecnología y Juegos
Maximum PCMaximum PC

Maximum PC November 2017

Maximum PC is the magazine that every computer geek, PC gamer, or content creator should read every month. Get Maximum PC digital magazine subscription today for punishing product reviews, thorough how-to articles, and the illuminating technical news and information that PC power users crave. Maximum PC covers every single topic that requires a lightning-fast PC, from video editing and music creation to PC gaming; we write about it all with unbounded enthusiasm for our collective hobby.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Limited US
Leer Máskeyboard_arrow_down
SUSCRIBIRSE
USD8.99
13 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time2 min.
one brand over another

a thing or two about a thing or two FOR AS LONG AS COMPUTERS have been around, so have camps. And I’m not referring to the types of camps you find in the woods. I’m talking about sides— people choosing one side over another side, and fighting about things on a near religious level. You see it everywhere: Mac versus PC. Android versus iOS. AMD versus Intel. People get really passionate about the brands they beholden themselves to. When this happens, things get really personal. Attacks are made and insults are tossed across the border, as though one had to defend themselves on a personal level. I find this to be frustrating because conversations tend to deteriorate, and the merits of a product become lost. For me, focusing on empirical data yields much…

access_time3 min.
equifax loses data on 143m americans

the beginning of the magazine, where the articles are small ON JULY 29, credit monitoring company Equifax discovered that over the previous weeks it had been hacked, and a huge amount of personal data had been stolen. This included full names and addresses, birth dates, social security numbers, driver’s license numbers, and even credit card numbers. It is the biggest security breach since Yahoo in 2014. It’s not just the sheer volume of data stolen, it’s the quality. Equifax is used by financial institutions to check identities and credit worthiness of potential customers. The stolen data is ideal for credit fraud and identity theft. Why are you reading this now? Because Equifax didn’t say anything for more than five weeks. Once it had confessed, a website and hotline were set up for…

access_time2 min.
a movie a day, every day

HOW IS THIS FOR A DEAL? Take your $9.95 a month MoviePass card into any theater that takes debit cards, swipe, and get a ticket, one per day. This is the new deal from MoviePass, and it has proved popular— subscriptions jumped from around 20,000 to over 150,000 in just two days. MoviePass has been around since 2011. It started with a cumbersome voucher system, and then ran through various pricing structures, none especially cheap. In 2016, one of Netflix’s founders, Mitch Lowe, became CEO. This year, the company was bought out by the analytics firm Helios and Matheson, and on the same day it announced the business model that has done Netflix and others so well: a cheap flat-rate subscription that lets you binge if you wish. The huge surge in…

access_time1 min.
lenovo finally fined

THE WHEELS OF THE LAW may move slowly, but they get you in the end. In 2015, it emerged that Lenovo had been selling laptops that came pre-installed with adware called VisualDiscovery, from SuperFish. This pushed pop-up ads from Lenovo partners when you mouse over similar content. It also collected a lot of data without your consent. Most worryingly, it messed with Digital Certificates, replacing them with less secure versions. A fuss was made, and a removal tool offered. Lenovo claimed to be unaware of the security implications. The Federal Trade Commission has said the company must gain user permission for any future adware, as well as test its software for security flaws for the next 20 years. The company also took home a $3.5 million fine.…

access_time1 min.
juicero squeezed out

THE JUICERO IS, or rather was, an Internet-enabled machine that squeezed sachets of fresh vegetables and fruit into juice. As a start-up, the San Francisco company attracted some big-name investors, including Google Ventures. The $699 machine it finally delivered was lovely, but hugely over-engineered. It didn’t help that you could squeeze some of the packs by hand with very similar results. The machine would only squeeze branded packs, and refused anything out of date, no matter how wholesome it still was. Dropping the price to $399 didn’t help, especially as it was losing money, even at the higher price. It will be remembered, though. As a triumph of optimism over reality more than anything else; it has been the victim of much schadenfreude and mockery. Some investors say that an anti-elitist…

access_time1 min.
tech triumphs and tragedies

TRIUMPHS XBOX ONE GETS KEYBOARD AND MOUSE At last, you can use PC-style game controls on your console, possibly in time for Xmas. AMD OUTSELLS INTEL OK, it’s only according to one German retailer so far, but AMD sales are buoyant. NEW SAFE BATTERY A new full-power Lithium-ion battery is in the labs that won’t catch fire or explode. TRAGEDIES VOICE ASSISTANT HIJACK It turns out they can be controlled by sounds beyond human hearing. CHINA BANS ICOS Only “temporary,” but signs are that the Chinese state is moving to curb and control cryptocurrencies. FAKE LIKES A security hole in Facebook has enabled the creation of 100 million fake “likes.”…

help