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Maximum PCMaximum PC

Maximum PC October 2017

Maximum PC is the magazine that every computer geek, PC gamer, or content creator should read every month. Get Maximum PC digital magazine subscription today for punishing product reviews, thorough how-to articles, and the illuminating technical news and information that PC power users crave. Maximum PC covers every single topic that requires a lightning-fast PC, from video editing and music creation to PC gaming; we write about it all with unbounded enthusiasm for our collective hobby.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Limited US
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13 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time2 min.
landing the big punches

a thing or two about a thing or two THIS IS AN IMPORTANT ISSUE for me. But I reckon it’s important for the whole PC community. I feel as though this is one of those times when you get to hold a company’s future in your hands, literally. I am, of course, referring to our review of AMD’s Ryzen Threadripper. I treat Threadripper as AMD’s first halo product in years. Many of the company’s recent releases have been iterations on existing products, and while that’s great, Threadripper stands on its own as being ballsy. Here’s the thing about halo products: Not many can afford them, and many more people don’t need them. I always refer to Audi when talking about halo products, because ever since the release of its R8 supercar, the company…

access_time3 min.
more core wars

the beginning of the magazine, where the articles are small Gamers after every iota of performance will want one, but it comes at a cost. EVEN IF YOU HAVE no intention of using an AMD Ryzen or Threadripper, their very existence is good news. It has made Intel respond with faster and better; competition is back. Intel’s latest response is highend Core i9s, available by the time you read this. We now have the skinny on the fastest four. At the top of the tree is the lovely 18-core i9-7980XE, running at a base clock of 2.6GHz, with a Turbo mode of up to 4.4GHz. As with all the new i9s, we get quad-channel DDR4 and 44 PCIe lanes. Below this, we have a 16-core i9-7960X running at 2.8GHz, the 14-core i9-7940X at…

access_time2 min.
bitcoin makes a hard fork

Bitcoin has now become bitcoin and bitcoin cash (name could have been less confusing, guys), wallets being populated with an equal number of the new version, creating $4 billion of cryptocurrency overnight. The blockchain has been cloned, known as a hard fork. The nature of the math behind bitcoin means that transactions, and hence new coins, become increasingly more convoluted to make. The original specs have slowed this to a crawl. Bitcoin cash uses the same basic blockchain system as bitcoin, but with much bigger blocks, up from 1MB to 8MB. The bitcoin miners now have something potentially profitable to chew on again. The arrival of bitcoin cash caused a spike in bitcoin’s value, to near $3,500. But, given the volatility of bitcoin, printed valuations are ephemeral. The split mirrors that of…

access_time1 min.
password rules wrong

In 2003, the National Institute of Standards and Technology said passwords should contain upper and lower case letters, a number, a special character, and should be changed frequently. Many services insist you follow this format, leading to passwords that are difficult to rEm3mB%r. Bill Burr, the man behind the rules, has confirmed what many argue is correct: it’s about password length. Four random words are more difficult to crack, and easier to recall. NIST has issued new guidelines, which also suggest not changing passwords unless a security breach is suspected. The old system created passwords that were cryptographically weak, but hard to use. “Much of what I did I now regret,” said Bill. To be fair, it was also our fault; we used common number substitutions, and simple base words. Don’t…

access_time1 min.
500,000 want a tesla 3

The massive demand for Tesla’s new $35,000 Model 3 shows that we are ready for the mainstream electric car—the company had over half a million reservations on its books at one point. This makes it the most anticipated car ever. To fund manufacturing, Tesla has been forced to sell $1.5 billion in bonds, and the money men look happy enough to buy them. Over the first quarter of 2017, it built 25,000 cars, a new record for Tesla, but a long way from its plan for 500,000 a year—even at this level, it is under a tenth of Ford’s annual production. Tesla has a lot riding on the Model 3; despite catching the zeitgeist beautifully, the company still made a loss of over $330 million last year. The list of problems…

access_time1 min.
tech triumphs and tragedies

TRIUMPHS QUANTUM TELEPORTATION IN SPACE Chinese scientists have sent a photon 300 miles up to a space station. Unhackable instant Internet still a way off, though. HYPERLOOP AT 192MPH Elon Musk’s magnetic-levitation pod in a tunnel is due for fullscale test in South Korea. DISNEY GOES STREAMING Next year, Mickey and chums will have their own streaming service, including original content. TRAGEDIES SURFACE WOES Consumer Report has stopped recommending the Microsoft Surface after breakage rates reach 25 percent after two years. DOTA FANS UNHAPPY Valve’s new digital trading card game based on Dota hasn’t gone down well with fans—cue an online hissy fit. MORE UBER CHAOS One of the company’s investors, Benchmark Capital, is suing CEO Travis Kalanick for fraud.…

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