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Multihulls TodayMultihulls Today

Multihulls Today Winter 2017-18

MQ-Multihulls Quarterly is the only magazine published in North America for multihull enthusiasts, both power and sail. Created by the publishers of Blue Water Sailing magazine, MQ offers news and notes from around the multihull world, in depth reviews of new multihulls and relevant gear and equipment, and offers great personal stories from sailors and cruisers all around the world who spend their time on the water aboard their multihulls – either catamarans or trimarans.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Blue Water Sailing
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access_time2 min.
the age of multihulls

Our friends who have been building and selling multihulls for years are pinching themselves because they are seeing so many sailors and powerboat owners choosing a multihull as their next boat. What used to be oddities are now the new normal. We used to call trimarans, monohulls with training wheels. And cruising cats were deemed by the experts – monohull sailing experts – to be unsafe and liable to flip over. In the boating community, old prejudices die hard and there are still cruisers who tell you that heading offshore in a multihull is for people who just do not know better. But that salty or crusty group is a dwindling breed. Today’s young sailors and families heading out cruising are embracing the many virtues of cruising multihulls. They enjoy the…

access_time3 min.
antares catamarans rise again

This is a good story because it has a happy ending for the recent buyers of Antares 44i catamarans, for the builder and for those who are in line to buy a new Antares in the months ahead. As many readers will know, the previous owners of the Antares brand moved the company to Argentina and employed Memo Castro and his son Sancho to put together a team and a facility and to start building the boats. The facility that the company used was set up to build three boats at a time and a maximum of five boats a year. In 2016, the principals of the company ran out of cash and had to shut down the operation, even though there were boats being built and new orders, with deposits,…

access_time2 min.
back to the future in a full foiling folding trimaran

If Marty McFly was headed back to the future and needed Doc to come up with a traveling time machine, these days he wouldn’t want a tricked out Delorean, what he really needs is a new TF10. Designed by Morrelli & Melvin and built in Holland by DNA (the same firm that built the foiling G4 catamaran), the new boat has been conceived as a one-design racer capable of incredible speeds and with the ability to undertake some point to point or distance races. It even has almost six feet of headroom in the tiny cabin. The trimaran design is fast in its own right but by adding the Z foils and the T rudders, it is like adding Doc’s time warp travel device to a sports car. The foils have…

access_time3 min.
dream yacht charter after irma

Dream Yacht Charter, one of the largest and fastest growing charter companies has bases all over the world. But, they also have a big base in Tortola, BVI, that suffered a direct hit from Hurricane Irma back in September. Dream’s BVI base is in Hodges Creek where there are normally 60 to 65 cruising catamarans available for charter or managed for their owners. MQ had a long conversation with Dream’s General Manager, Dan Lockyer a few weeks after the hurricane. Dan had not been to the BVI but had been getting daily updates from the BVI base. MQ: Charter fleets in the BVI all have detailed plans for hurricanes. What does Dream do when it looks like the islands will get a direct hit? DL: Yes, we have a detailed plan and a…

access_time7 min.
thoughts on multihull design

I was interested to read in your Multihulls Quarterly, (Summer 2017, page 25) under the heading “Multihulls Have Arrived” this statement: “These are not your grandfather’s catamarans. The early model cruising catamarans with plywood slab sides and V-ed hulls over ribs and chines, could be built in your backyard. And, if you built it well you could run up the coast keeping an eye on the nearby shore. Those who ventured across oceans in those early multihulls were considered extreme sailors.” The reference “with V-ed hulls”, obviously refers to me and my designs and I take exception to this statement, particularly its derogatory reference of being only suitable for coastal sailing. I designed and built my first plywood V-ed hull catamaran in Trinidad in 1958 and sailed it 2,000 miles north to…

access_time10 min.
15 tips for making catamaran sailing safer and more pleasurable

Over the past 30 years I’ve been privileged to earn my living as a yacht broker. I’ve visited over 58 countries on these yachting adventures and made friends the world over, most of whom have taught me valuable nuggets of information on the art of catamaran voyaging. I am asked, often enough, how safe is it to sail on a modern catamaran. I can say with some measure of pleasure that, so far, of the over 750 catamarans we have sold at The Multihull Company not a single customer in our family has capsized while sailing. This is quite amazing when you consider that we specialize in live-aboard sailors, adventurers, and performance cat enthusiasts. The number of our customers who have circumnavigated is considerable. The above said, we’ve had a couple dismastings…

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