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Multihulls TodayMultihulls Today

Multihulls Today Winter 2019

MQ-Multihulls Quarterly is the only magazine published in North America for multihull enthusiasts, both power and sail. Created by the publishers of Blue Water Sailing magazine, MQ offers news and notes from around the multihull world, in depth reviews of new multihulls and relevant gear and equipment, and offers great personal stories from sailors and cruisers all around the world who spend their time on the water aboard their multihulls – either catamarans or trimarans.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Blue Water Sailing
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access_time2 min.
getting the lead out

We once sailed our Mason 43 monohull Clover some 60,000 miles as we circled the globe. The adventure took us five years and along the way we visited 34 countries where we collected all kinds of memorabilia. Every year when we hauled out to refresh the antifouling, we would have to raise the boot stripe by an inch as Clover got heavier and heavier. But that really didn’t affect her sailing performance since her keel was already filled with 8,000 pounds of lead. She’d go six knots no matter what and hardly a knot faster whether it was blowing 10 or 30 knots. When we got home and took all of our stuff off the boat, she floated four full inches higher in the water so the boot stripe was…

access_time5 min.
two new, chris white-designed atlantic catamarans

AMERICAN CHRIS WHITE HAS BEEN A PIONEER IN multihull design and construction for nearly 40 years. His Atlantic series of cats have set the standard for custom, high-performance cruising catamarans that are particularly suitable for experienced couples who cruise widely about the world. With the launch in Rhode Island of two new cats, MQ asked Chris to offer some thoughts on these new creations. He wrote this short brief on the new 70 and 72 from his own Atlantic 55 Javelin in Mazatlan, Mexico as he was leaving the harbor for a passage to the Baha Peninsula. This summer saw the launch of two new blue cats. They look kind of the same, except for the rigs, so what gives? The Atlantic 70, Saphira, was the first one to get started and…

access_time7 min.
power cruising in a bahamian paradise

Having lived in Florida my entire life, and with the ability to hop on a short flight to the Bahamas, you would guess that this Sunshine-State local would spend weekends on the beautiful sands of Bimini or in the gin-clear waters of the Abacos. Sadly, I am ashamed to say, this is not the case. But when the first opportunity to cruise these amazing islands came a’knocking, I was all in. The Abacos were everything we envisioned and more. We were seven friends with the opportunity to charter in the not-so-chartered islands of the Abacos, we welcomed the freedom to go where we wanted to go, when we wanted to go, all while cruising and discovering different islands each day. And how to best achieve this? If you are in the…

access_time8 min.
the path to the cruising life

It started one Sunday afternoon while my husband was watching football when I asked him, “Have you ever thought about blue water sailing?” “Yes, all my life. Why?” I’m not sure where this question came from. It just came out of my mouth. I had never thought about going cruising. Maybe this was a sign? Over the next few months, I began researching monohulls online and would show the boats’ specifications to my husband during football commercials. I asked him if he had ever been on a sailboat? He said, “Yes, when I was a kid I used to sail Sabots.” He told me stories of Friday night beer can races with his friend Frank and a few others. My husband said he’d ask Frank to take us out on a day sail. Frank…

access_time10 min.
20 tips of multihulls seamanship

Over the past few decades I’ve been privileged to earn my living as a yacht broker who specializes in catamarans. I’ve visited about 50 countries in the business and made great friends the world over, most of whom have taught me valuable nuggets of information on the art of catamaran voyaging. I am asked, often enough, how safe is it to sail on a catamaran? I can say with some measure of pleasure that, so far, of the over 800 catamarans we have sold at The Multihull Company and Balance Catamarans that not a single customer of ours has capsized—at least that I know of! This is quite amazing when you consider that we specialize in liveaboard sailors, adventurers, and performance cat enthusiasts. The above said, I’ve had a couple dismastings in…

access_time9 min.
multihull storm tactics

As I came up on deck I could see the wide-eyed looks in everyone’s faces. The catamaran was going too fast, and no one fully understood what to do. The speed had crept up on the crew, and I could hear it and feel it even while sleeping fitfully below. With seas building and the apparent wind angle moving to a close reach, more speed could mean more trouble than anyone wanted to face. It would be a good opportunity to demonstrate the “miracle” of trailing warps off the stern. On sailboats most of us spend the vast majority of time trying to figure out how to make the boat go faster. Easing or trimming, a little less helm or a little more sail help create a vast array of tweaks…

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