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Plane & Pilot

Plane & Pilot January/February 2018

Plane & Pilot is the ultimate resource for active pilots who desire an information-rich magazine with timely and entertaining content. Get Plane & Pilot digital magazine subscription today for pilot reports on the newest LSA, certified piston-engine and light-turbine aircraft, expert tips on flying techniques, product reviews of the latest gear and seasoned aviator stories from the sky.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Madavor Media, LLC
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11 Números

en este número

3 min.
who was really first to fly?

THE BACKSTORY The popular story of who flew first is easy. It was the Wright Brothers, at Kill Devil Hills (Kitty Hawk), North Carolina, December 17, 1903. Orville was at the controls, and there are photographs of the plane, the Wright Flyer, on that very flight, which lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet. To be clear, the flight we’re talking about was the first flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft taking off under its own power and achieving sustained, controlled flight. There were lots of other aircraft before the Wrights’ big day on the Outer Banks. Chinese kites were used to lift men, reportedly to great heights, around 2,000 years ago. Humancarrying balloon flights became common in the late 1700s. Benjamin Franklin witnessed what was at the time the longest first…

7 min.
rewarding and surprising feedback

Most objects in life can be improved—some are so bad they cry out to be fixed—though there are exceptions. Why, for example, would anyone want to “fix” the feel of a worn-in pair of cowboy boots, the oddly angular shape of a Cub Yellow J-3, or the feel-it-in-your-gut roar of a Merlin V-12 flying by impossibly fast and low? What would be the point? Perfect is a two-edged sword, though, and those of us who try to describe flying to others face the doubly daunting challenge of addressing a subject, flying, that is beautiful and meaningful beyond words but that is also impossible to do justice to by using words. We can hope to get close to the source of the wonder, to describe the feeling that this strange and sacred…

2 min.
tires

First pneumatic airplane-specific tire: Goodyear 1909 Number of tires on the Antonov AN-225 freighter: 32 Typical cost of a tire for a light plane: $100-$250 Cost of the tires on the Airbus A380: About $5,500 apiece Number of retreads a tire can take: Up to 10 before replacement Composition of almost all aircraft tires: Rubber, steel and fabric Length of time it takes NASCAR pit crews to change a tire: A few seconds For ready-to-go crew to change a tire on an Airbus A320: 45 minutes Inflation pressure in a typical car’s tires: 35 psi Inflation of the tires in a Lockheed Martin F-16: 320 psi Inflation gas in a light plane: Air In an airliner: Nitrogen Reason: Nitrogen is inert, so it doesn’t react with the rubber at high altitudes Rated speed for a typical airliner tire: 200-250 mph Reason for chines (perpendicular…

5 min.
accident briefs

MOONEY AIRPLANE CO INC M20TN Atlantic Ocean near Atlantic City, NJ: 1 Fata The commercial pilot departed Michigan on a personal crosscountry flight in the autopilot-equipped airplane destined for New Jersey. Air traffic control records indicated that after the airplane departed, about 12:00, a controller instructed the pilot to climb to 25,000 ft mean sea level (MSL). At 12:16, the pilot read back the assigned altitude and continued toward the destination. About 23 minutes later, the controller attempted to contact the pilot; however, the pilot did not respond. Controllers’ repeated attempts to contact the pilot throughout the remainder of the flight were unsuccessful as the airplane continued flying a straight course toward the destination. According to radar data, about 2 hours 22 minutes after the pilot’s last transmission and while about 5 miles…

7 min.
aviation gear of the year

Garmin G5 Last spring, Garmin introduced a brand-new standalone solid-state flight instrument at a remarkably low price. That product is the G5 ($2,499)— not the attitude instrument that Garmin launched last year but an HSI that incorporates its own attitude and heading sensors so when it’s installed in a dual G5 configuration, it can revert to an attitude indicator in what Garmin rightly calls the “unlikely event” of a failure of the other instrument. The G5 can also serve as the primary nav reference when paired with an approved nav source, such as a Garmin or other compatible multifunction navigator, like the GNS 430W or newer GTN models. Included in the price is the instrument, a magnetometer, backup battery and the STC to install the unit. Garmin is also offering a dual…

3 min.
sporty’s new flight training apps will sync you up

Sporty’s, the company that has made its name for more than 50 years with an ever-increasing number of ever more technologically advanced training products, has spent the last year-plus overhauling its most popular courses by updating much of the video to 4K, so it’s even better quality than many of us can even display right now (the operative words being “right now”). There are 32 new video segments, including all of the step-by-step guides to flying the required maneuvers for the flight test. In fact, Sporty’s overhauled much of the content to make it even fresher, more graphically appealing and engaging. I recently went through a couple of the company’s new offerings—its ForeFlight training guide and its Instrument Pilot course—and came away impressed by the work. I’ve been an instrument pilot…