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REVOLUTION DIGITAL

REVOLUTION DIGITAL

Issue 35

REVOLUTION is a quarterly magazine that lives and breathes horology. Published in 12 countries in a wide range of languages, REVOLUTION is an integrated lifestyle title that celebrates the mechanical watch as the primary tool for self expression. REVOLUTION covers all aspects of watchmaking and the watch industry, from the vibrant personalities who inhabit this rarefied sphere to exquisite timepieces that exemplify the pinnacles of craftsmanship, technology and hallowed tradition. For the individual who appreciates the finer things in life, REVOLUTION is a paean to the one true luxury in this world — time.

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País:
Singapore
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Revolution Media Pte Ltd
Periodicidad:
Quarterly
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USD 21.99
4 Números

en este número

11 min.
founder’s note

I’ve been thinking about how our tastes as watch collectors will be shaped by the crazy roller-coaster ride of 2020, which, as I write this, coincides with second and even third waves of resurgences of the COVID-19 pandemic around the world. And my takeaway is this. First, it is absolutely incredible to me how so many people think that not wearing a mask, socialising in groups, arms around each other at dinner venues like chorus girls, gyrating en masse at nightclubs and beaches while hosing each other down with an Old Testament deluge of vapor molecules directly into each other’s eyes, mouths, noses and, yes, lungs is totally unrelated to the staggering, skyrocketing increase in infections that’s happening around the world. Sorry, that was just a bit of me venting.…

2 min.
contributor’s page

Atom Moore is an internationally renowned, New York City-based photographer who fell into the watch world by virtue of his love for the subject plus a keen eye for macro photography. He has three acclaimed photography exhibitions under his belt. Atom describes himself as a cycling, digital technology and beard enthusiasts. He also really loves desserts. Nick Foulkes has penned over 20 works of non-fiction on subjects as diverse as cigars and porcelain, but to us, he is one of the best-known English language writers on timepieces. His most recent book was Patek Philippe: The Authorized Biography. He is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and How to Spend It. Cesare Maria Mannucci Celebrated automotive journalist and co-author of Time to Race, Cesare Maria Mannucci has covered more than 320 F1 Grand…

2 min.
open heart

Skeletonised timepieces first appeared during the 18th century, and were once exclusive to the highest levels of watchmaking. Today, numerous interpretations of openworked dial can be found at all levels, and in nearly every collection. On the bleeding edge, Piaget has exposed the inner workings of a groundbreaking ultra-slim movement, wherein the mainplate and case are integrated, machined from a single piece of cobalt alloy. Meanwhile, Louis Vuitton leaves only tourbillon mechanicals and the house’s famed monogram rendered in beveled edges, a monument to all-out precision. Roger Dubuis uses twisted shards to keep 558 components in place, as if by magic, and Breguet introduces a new Tradition Automatique Seconde Rétrograde 7097 with a blue guilloché dial in gold. Reservoir famously took away the hour hand; now it’s effectively removed the…

1 min.
pick your poison

How many watches does it take to make a trend? Looking at this year’s selection of watches for women, we’re instantly struck with the thought: there really wasn’t one discernible trend, although many exciting offerings. You have maisons like Cartier and Piaget returning to their roots in jewellery. You have manufactures like Audemars Piguet and Breitling downsizing and returning to classical sizes that suit both genders. And then of course, there are new creations designed from the ground up with women in mind; from beloved brands like MB&F, Bvlgari, Vacheron Constantin and Zenith. So back to the question, what is trending now? Maybe it’s that women are finally being seen and heard. Maybe what we’re trying to say is, women have been left out of the equation for too long and…

7 min.
great expectations

At Cartier, Black Lives Matter. “As a Maison, our creativity is nurtured and inspired by the diverse cultures of the world,” reads a statement from the brand accompanying a black square posted to its Instagram feed on June 2nd. “We find our own richness in this diversity, and we stand firmly against all forms of racism directed toward the Black Community. At this moment we are examining our own company to identify actions we can take that will result in real change. #BlackoutTuesday.” The French luxury brand was not the only watchmaker to express solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement on June 2nd (others included IWC Schaffhausen and the luxury group Kering, owner of Ulysse Nardin and Girard-Perregaux), but it was certainly among the few. It’s unclear how to interpret…

10 min.
the evolution of the rolex steel submariner

There are dozens of waterproof dive watches available on the market and there have been since the early 1950s. However, if you asked 100 people to name a dive watch, I’m pretty sure that 90 plus of those asked would name the Rolex Submariner. Much more than a tool watch, the Submariner has become an icon of both horology and style. With or without a date, it’s a timeless classic that Rolex has slowly and gently revised over the years, yet is still as true to its DNA today as it was nearly 70 years ago. And this year, Rolex has given the line a tweak to include modifications to its case, movement and bracelet. So let’s take a look back at the Submariner’s roots as a timeless icon of…