Shooting Times & Country 1-Dec-2021

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidad:
Weekly
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USD 3.38
USD 105.40
52 Números

en este número

1 min.
the troll toll

Last week, I stood around a fire in the woods with Paul Childerley, a stalker and gamekeeper who will be known to many of you. We’d spent the morning walking-up pheasants and along the way we’d bumped into a few dog walkers. His ground is only an hour and a half from London and is therefore often busy. I was interested to hear, however, that he almost never has any confrontational interactions with members of the public. “They usually either wish you well or just carry on by,” he said. As we cooked our lunch, Paul said he often wonders if those who shoot overestimate the number of people who dislike fieldsports. Paul and I have both been on the receiving end of online harassment over the years from those who don’t…

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2 min.
landmark report assesses impact of gamebird release

The questions over the impact of pheasant and partridge releases have been answered in a definitive new report from the GWCT. The ecological impact of releasing millions of gamebirds every year has been a topic of increasing debate and has been the latest angle of attack for shooting’s opponents. Now two top scientists from the GWCT, Dr Rufus Sage and Dr Roger Draycott, have analysed research from more than 140 papers and brought their conclusions together into a freely available 52-page report. The report looks at the positives associated with releasing gamebirds, such as the creation of woodlands and hedgerows, but also considers the potential for negative impacts such as disease and damage to soil and invertebrates. “All shoots are encouraged to follow the GWCT’s principles” Explaining the report’s overall findings, Dr Draycott, director of…

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1 min.
grouse moor closure impact

A dog groomer from the eastern Highlands has won praise from the fieldsports community after she spoke out passionately about the impact of closing down grouse moors. Footage has emerged of the woman addressing the conference of anti-grouse shooting organisation Revive at its annual conference in Perth. After stepping up to the microphone and explaining the importance of gundogs to her business, she said: “What kind of employment would you have for locals like me if you shut grouse moors?” After a brief reply from Chris Packham, who was chairing the meeting, one of the panellists insisted that there could still be shooting. However, unconvinced, the dog groomer pushed home her attack, asking: “If you closed down a grouse moor estate, the community within the estate is fragile, rural and interlinked —there…

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1 min.
trophy law change delayed

The Animals Abroad Bill, which could ban the import of some hunting trophies, has been delayed. It is now believed that the draft bill will not be published until February 2022, nearly two years after initial consultations took place. The bill is the responsibility of Defra, which has asked for more time to consult with experts. The delay follows an evidence session in which anti-hunting campaigners shot themselves in the foot with a series of obviously and grossly misleading claims. Among these were that research shows that trophy hunting has “profound effects on wildlife” — the study in question was purely theoretical — huge underestimates of wildlife populations and a claim that trophies were not exported from the UK. Among the African voices welcoming the delay was an editorial in the online…

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1 min.
to do this week

FEED With the weather getting suddenly chilly, birds will need more feeding both to maintain condition and because wanderers will come home, so expect your wheat bill to increase. Birds aren’t the only things that could do with a bit extra on cold days. Guns, beaters and pickers-up will all benefit from a bit more in their bellies. SHOOT Walk a boggy corner for a snipe. In the standing water and thick reeds where the pheasants don’t roam is where you will find the wintering snipe. A quiet evening walk with a steady spaniel can give challenging shooting. Snipe fly low and fast, so a calm head and good situational awareness are essential.…

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2 min.
is a trail hunting ban mere gesture politics?

Pressure is building on the hunting communities of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in the aftermath of the conviction of Masters of Foxhounds Association (MFHA) directorMarkHankinson(News, 27 October). The Scottish government is currently looking at the possibility of banning trail hunting. Natural Resources Wales (NRW) has announced that all trail hunting on land under its management will end immediately and it will not renew its contract with the MFHA. Dominic Driver, NRW’s head of land stewardship, said: “The outcome of the court case against a senior leader of the MFHA has resulted in a loss of confidence in the organisation’s ability to ensure its activities are carried out within the law and terms of its agreement. “In order to assure ourselves properly that trail hunting on our estate wasn’t being used as a…

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