Shooting Times & Country 13-Oct-2021

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 3.34
USD 104.18
52 Números

en este número

1 min.
shooting times proof, pudding

Recently, Rose Prince wrote a brilliant piece about the lingering perception that game is something for the wealthy (Why our game is still stuck in a class divide, 1 September). She dug into rural Victorian history and explored everything from poaching to the price of game then versus average annual incomes. She is right that the general public still don’t feel entirely comfortable with game, but I suspect that a lot of it comes down to a lack of familiarity. We probably have friends or neighbours who are keen on cooking and who like the idea of eating meat sustainably. Why don’t you make a list of such people and take them some choice birds to cook this season? Don’t, obviously, hand them an undressed cock pheasant, wishing them ‘bon appétit’,…

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2 min.
sga won’t support basc’s recreational stalker plan

The Scottish Gamekeepers Association (SGA) has issued an apparent rebuke to BASC over its plans for more involvement of recreational deerstalkers in managing Scotland’s deer (News, 6 October). In a scathing blog, SGA chairman Alex Hogg questioned the motive behind the BASC plan. Mr Hogg said: “If this is about opportunism and winning new shooting grounds for members, then there are likely to be questions asked about how this will make things better for deer management in Scotland today.” “If this is about opportunism, there are questions to be asked” In 2019 the SGA made its own calls for communities to be given more of a role in deer management with a ‘10-year vision’ for deer in Scotland. That vision called for a pilot scheme which used recreational stalkers to help tackle specific…

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1 min.
verdict due in hunting trial

A verdict is due on Friday in the trial of one of the UK’s top hunting officials. Mark Hankinson, the director of the Masters of Foxhounds Association, was tried for encouraging or assisting others to commit Hunting Act offences after anti-hunting groups obtained a video of a webinar led by Mr Hankinson, which was published online and passed to police. In his closing remarks, prosecution lawyer Gregory Gordon said: “His words were clear, his advice was capable of encouraging hunts to commit illegal hunting, and his intention was to encourage illegal hunting.” Mr Gordon continued: “Over the course of five minutes, during a webinar arranged by the Hunting Office on 11 August 2020, the defendant offered advice to hunt masters on how to hunt illegally, behind a smokescreen of trail hunting.” However, defending…

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1 min.
ngo issues shoot sab advice

The National Gamekeepers’ Organisation (NGO) has issued advice for dealing with saboteurs after grouse shoots were disrupted on 12 August by individuals with links to the hunt saboteur movement. The advice covers how to deal with saboteurs when they show up and includes tips such as “try to photograph the drivers of the vehicles or any that are not wearing face masks so that they can be identified later” and “any that are wearing face masks, try to photograph their clothing, including shoes; they can change jackets and so on, but footwear is more difficult and is often overlooked”. It also suggests powers that police officers can be encouraged to use to disperse saboteurs and challenges the police decision not to arrest or otherwise tackle grouse shooting saboteurs. Controversially, it claims that…

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1 min.
to do this week

CHECK With the nights getting colder, rats and mice will be looking for warmer winter accommodation and this can cause them to leave hedgerows and middens to head indoors. Safe and effective indoor rodent control is vital. Ensure you only use approved pistons, proper bait boxes or licensed traps, but keep on top of the furry visitors before they get out of hand. CHECK If you have got a couple of weeks’ shooting under your belt, it might be clear which ones are going to be your problem pegs. Consider options for moving them, perhaps replace them with a walking Gun, or at least make sure no one gets more than one of them a day.…

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2 min.
why are we importing new zealand venison?

A Scottish farmer has expressed dismay after finding New Zealand venison in a pack marked ‘Highland Game’ and apparently endorsed by Forestry and Land Scotland. Sybil Macpherson took to Facebook after spotting the product in her local supermarket. In a post accompanied by a photograph, Mrs Macpherson said: “I was surprised and disappointed to read the label on this venison for sale yesterday. Why, when we have ample supplies of Scottish venison available, is Tesco selling imported meat labelled ‘Highland Game working with Forestry and Land Scotland’?” Shooting Timeshas been aware for some time of reports that Dundee-based company Highland Game has been continuing to import significant volumes of venison from New Zealand, despite a stubbornly low price for domestic venison. Farmed venison is preferred by some producers as carcasses are more consistent…

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