Shooting Times & Country 17-Feb-2021

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 3.44
USD 107.32
52 Números

en este número

1 min.
doing our bit

Last weekend, I was doing some back-of-a-fag-packet calculations on the cost of having a new pond dug. Roughly based on my last one, it’ll be a sniff over a grand. The spot I’ve identified sits alongside a patch of reedbeds, where an old cock pheasant is often to be found. A thousand pounds is a fair whack but when I think of the goslings that will hopefully fledge there and the duck that will drop in on cold blowy nights it becomes clear that another pond would be worth building if it was going to be £3,000. Over the past century in England and Wales, we have lost almost a million ponds. When you combine that with most counties losing half their hedges and hundreds of thousands of acres of broadleaf…

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2 min.
wild justice action is waste of conservation resources

The shocking cost of defending Wild Justice’s failed attack on the general licences in Wales has been exposed by Shooting Times. The anti-shooting campaign group brought the action in the hope of having the licences declared unlawful by the court, forcing their withdrawal. But the High Court judge rejected all of the group’s claims (News, 27 January). In a subsequent costs order, the group was ordered to pay £10,000 — the maximum allowed under the Aarhus Convention (News, 10 February). Responding to a Freedom of Information request from Shooting Times, Natural Resources Wales (NRW) explained that it was unable to calculate the full cost of defending the action due to the number of staff hours that were spent on it. However, the external legal advice it needed and its court representation took…

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1 min.
eu to ban all lead ammo

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has proposed regulations that would ban the use of lead in all shotgun and rifle ammunition in the European Union. The proposals include a five-year transition to a complete ban on the use and sale of all lead shotgun and rifle ammo, with a possible derogation for events such as Olympic shooting where lead can be prevented from reaching the wider environment. Commenting on the proposal, Kévin Cabanayre, of French hunting magazine Revue National de la Chasse, said: “The European Chemicals Agency has sounded the final assault against the use of lead in hunting and shooting ammunition and in fishing tackle, only a week after the announcement that the lead ban for all hunting in wetlands (including puddles) would come into force in February 2023. “Now the…

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1 min.
no cash for scots fieldsports

Scotland’s fieldsports businesses have been denied COVID-19 support for a second time. Operators of shooting and fishing businesses — which bring vital revenue into remote rural communities — had hoped to benefit from the same funding which has been provided to other businesses. However, it has been announced that they will not be eligible. The announcement was met with dismay by rural businesses. BASC wrote to Fergus Ewing MSP and Kate Forbes MSP, who are responsible for the latest round of funding, warning of the consequences to rural Scotland “if support is not made available in short order”. The Scottish government’s decision was also attacked by the Scottish Conservative Party. Shadow finance secretary Murdo Fraser, who represents the Mid Scotland and Fife region, said: “As BASC has stated, many country sports businesses…

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1 min.
to do this week

CROW CONTROL Try calling crows. As the corvids get more territorial, they may become easier to call in. Use of electronic calls is illegal, but handheld crow calls can be used to equally deadly effect. Like any form of crow shooting stealth and fieldcraft are essential, but with effective calling a crow could be lured within air rifle range. CALL FOXES If you have been struggling to call foxes with a squeak, this is the time to try a vixen call. Dog foxes distracted by thoughts of love can be very foolish.…

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2 min.
mountain hares could return to iconic moor

Mountain hares from abundant populations on Highland grouse moors could be heading south to help restore the diminished population on Langholm Moor if an offer from the Scottish Gamekeepers Association (SGA) is taken up. A large part of the moor was recently bought from the Duke of Buccleuch by a community group that aims to convert it into a nature reserve (News, 11 November 2020). The group recently advertised two jobs: a £35,000-a-year position for an estate manager and a £40,000-a-year job for a development manager. Among the challenges the newly appointed managers will have to face is that numbers of mountain hares crashed on Langholm Moor after management of the land for grouse ended. “Mountain hares were common when gamekeepers worked at Langholm. There is potential for a win-win here, for…

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