Shooting Times & Country 02-Jun-2021

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 3.44
USD 107.32
52 Números

en este número

1 min.
vegan friendly?

There aren’t many countries that are having an easy time, but on top of it all, in Australia, they are in the midst of a mouse plague. The situation is so bad that the government there has committed to a A$50million fund to help farmers. I thought of those Australians this week when I was reading Tom Payne’s piece on shooting pigeons over peas (see p34) and the whole thing got me thinking about veganism. The link might seem a strange one, but the connection is that creatures are being killed to protect produce that will go on to be seen as ‘vegan friendly’. In truth, those who eat almost anything have contributed to a system that necessitates the culling of animals at some point in the process. While there might not…

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2 min.
lacs under investigation by the charity commission

The League Against Cruel Sports (LACS) has found itself under investigation by the Charity Commission after activists launched another campaign of harassment against a business seen as supporting hunting. League activists launched a massive online attack against fundraising site Jumblebee after hunts, operating within the Hunting Act, raised funds on the site. Jumblebee is an online fundraising site whose aim is “to help charities, clubs and communities to raise funds for good causes… in a fun and engaging way, at minimum cost”. A hardcore of League-supporting ‘clicktivists’ besieged the company’s social media outlets, including its Twitter and Facebook pages, with many posts alleging that the site was supporting criminality. As the weight of posts forced the site to close its social media channels, the activists switched tactics and encouraged supporters to continue the…

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1 min.
groundhog day for grouse

Shooting organisations are preparing for yet another parliamentary debate on grouse shooting. The petition, titled ‘Ban driven grouse shooting: wilful blindness is no longer an option’, made it past the 100,000 vote response required to trigger a debate after being heavily promoted by Chris Packham. The debate is scheduled to take place in Westminster Hall on 21 June. Westminster Hall debates are not part of the formal process of making laws and no legal changes will come about whatever the outcome. During a previous debate on grouse shooting, held in 2016, nine MPs spoke in favour of shooting and none spoke in favour of a ban. While these debates are not part of the process of making law, they are important for shaping politicians’ views, and BASC, the Countryside Alliance and the GWCT…

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1 min.
warning over uk wildfires

One of the UK’s top academic geographers has warned that the UK is moving towards a situation like that of the US or Spain where large wildfires could be a regular occurrence. Dr Thomas Smith, assistant professor in environmental geography at the London School of Economics, said that climate change and alterations to land management had left the UK vulnerable to fires of increasing size and severity. The second largest number of severe wildfires on record occurred in 2020, with 75 fires covering at least six hectares. In total, 13,793 hectares of land was destroyed in fires, up from only 85 hectares in 2014. As well as the impact of climate change, Dr Smith told The Timesthat “traditional land management practices of using fire or grazing to thin moorland vegetation have been…

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1 min.
to do this week

DOG Get dogs swimming to keep them fit. Keeping gundogs fit but not overheated over the summer can be a challenge. Swimming is a great way to keep a dog in shape while keeping it cool. All but the most reluctant dogs can be persuaded to swim by throwing a dummy into the water for them. DUCK Support wild ducks with predator control now rather than releasing later. Helping wild ducks out has far greater conservation value than trying to artificially boost the population with releases. Controlling mink and corvids can boost duckling survival significantly and has knock-on benefits for other river dwellers as well.…

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2 min.
stoat control crucial to protect red-listed birds

Gamekeepers have spoken out on the value of stoat control as ground-nesting birds hit the peak of their breeding season and incidents of trap damage continue. In North Yorkshire, gamekeepers published images of a dead curlew, the fourth one found in the same small area of moorland. The accompanying text made it clear that the stoat responsible had been culled by keepers to prevent further damage. Tina Brough of the North Yorkshire Moors Moorland Organisation told Shooting Times: “Our gamekeepers do not want to eradicate the stoat population, they are just trying to prevent harm to our struggling population of ground-nesting birds.” Perthshire gamekeeper Ben Stevens used the example of a grouse nest to show the harm the mustelids can cause. Mr Stevens, who filmed the predated nest and made the video…

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