Shooting Times & Country 30-Jun-2021

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

Leer Más
País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 3.44
USD 107.32
52 Números

en este número

1 min.
non-violent eating

Some readers may only ever come across those who shoot, fish and know a good labrador when they see one, but I suspect most of us end up spending time with those who aren’t into fieldsports. Last weekend, a person I was having dinner with told me he’s vegan because he wants to eat in a ‘non-violent way’. An hour or so later, a pack of vegan butter appeared on the table. He shrugged when I asked what was in it and said half-jokingly that you’re better off not knowing. Curiosity piqued, I slipped off to the loo and did some Googling. Palm oil seems to be a very common ingredient, avocados another, and coconut often ends up in the mix. Over the past few weeks, I’ve eaten all sorts of…

shotimcouuk210630_article_004_01_01
2 min.
new bill is ‘open to mission creep and will be exploited’

A bill that could “curtail country sports such as fishing and shooting” has been mauled in the House of Lords as ‘unnecessary’, ‘ill conceived’ and ‘anthropomorphic’. The Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill was introduced in the Queen’s Speech earlier this year. The seemingly innocuous bill creates a committee to review the effect of legislation and policies “on the welfare of animals as sentient beings”. But it has prompted concern that it could be misused to disrupt activities including shooting, fishing and farming. The attack on the bill was led by Conservative former cabinet minister Michael Forsyth, Lord Forsyth of Drumlean, who said: “I have never seen a more badly drafted Bill — which has left me wondering what on earth its purpose is.” “The Hunting Act brought no benefit, quite the contrary” Lord Forsyth questioned…

shotimcouuk210630_article_006_01_01
1 min.
join bga’s lead-free register

As shooting organisations push on with the transition away from lead ammunition, the British Game Alliance (BGA) has launched a new register for its assured lead-free shoots. To join the BGA’s register fill out a short questionnaire on the BGA website. It asks for information such as the date on which the shoot went lead-free and the estimated number of birds the shoot will put into the food chain each season. Shoots registering as lead-free will be committing to a new clause in the BGA Standard, requiring the writing and implementation of a credible lead-free protocol on their shoot days. “The reality is that the food industry increasingly demands birds from lead-free shoots,” said the BGA’s commercial director Mark Staples. “Our lead-free register has been developed alongside our partner game dealers and…

shotimcouuk210630_article_007_01_01
1 min.
zambia breaks ban silence

Zambia has joined the list of African countries speaking out against a trophy import ban. The southern African country has traditionally been much quieter on the subject than nations such as Botswana and Namibia. However, a top conservation oficial has broken the silence to condemn western countries whose policies threaten livelihoods in rural Africa. In a statement addressed to the government of the US state of Connecticut, Dr Chuma Simukonda, director of the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, said: “It is unfortunate that such efforts promoted in the name of African species lack any input from Africans and are grounded on a protectionist mentality contrary to the sustainable-use model that has proven so successful in Zambia and much of southern Africa. Zambia’s wildlife is already stable without such ill-informed legislation. “Our wildlife…

shotimcouuk210630_article_007_02_01
1 min.
to do this week

BIRDS Encourage your gamebirds to be bold. Once your birds are roosting in trees, it is a good idea to encourage them to leave their pen for at least part of the day. This will also give the ground flora a rest and prepare the birds to live a more independent lifestyle later in the season. WIN You can help the Country Food Trust (CFT) to feed the needy while getting yourself a fabulous family holiday, a great day out or a fabulous meal. The top prize is a weekend stay at the luxurious Manor Farmhouse in the Cotswolds, but there are also tickets for the Game Fair or free dishes at the Game Fair restaurant Nice & Wild up for grabs. To buy a ticket, costing £25 each, visit bit.ly/CFTprize…

shotimcouuk210630_article_007_04_01
2 min.
just two speak against in grouse shoot debate

Pro-shooting interests have overwhelmingly taken the upper hand in the latest Parliamentary grouse shooting debate. The debate was opened by Ipswich MP Tom Hunt. He has won respect for a series of low-key visits to rural parts of his constituency, including a day beating, which he asked to join in order to understand shooting better. In his opening remarks, Mr Hunt drew on research by Professor Simon Denny and Tracey Latham-Green of the Institute for Social Innovation and Impact at the University of Northampton. Summarising their research, the Ipswich MP claimed that “grouse moors often bring people together, so there is a social impact to the economy. Levels of loneliness in isolated rural areas where grouse shooting happens are lower than in other areas.” “Ms McCarthy repeated a debunked claim that 12 to…

shotimcouuk210630_article_008_01_01