Shooting Times & Country 11-Aug-2021

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 3.44
USD 107.32
52 Números

en este número

1 min.
it’s in our dna

Weddings always seem to follow the same trajectory. By 5pm I’ve drunk too much champagne and by 11 — when most people are dancing — I’m standing in the corner of the marquee having a long conversation about shooting. “No need for a heavy over-and-under in Norfolk,” an art dealer told me last week, shouting over the DJ, “a side-by-side is just the thing.” The next day, I sat on the front in Wells eating chips with one of those hangovers that has you telling everybody you’ll never drink again. Down at the harbour wall, children crouched, catching crabs with hooks baited with bacon. The drizzly air was alive with their delighted cheers and the screeching of the gulls. It struck me, watching them, that they were satisfying some primal desire…

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2 min.
campaign group misleads on grouse shooting ‘ban’

Attempts to push some of the country’s leading companies into abandoning grouse shooting continue to fail. In an attempt to use the press to ambush Yorkshire Water, anti-shooting campaigners have been promoting the claim that the company is ending shooting leases on land it owns. The Yorkshire Post ran the story under the headline “Yorkshire Water to end grouse shooting tenancies on two of its moors, with eight more up for review”. The article made the extraordinary claim that “Yorkshire Water committed to a phasing out of shooting tenancies following two years of talks with campaign group Wild Moors, formerly known as Ban Bloodsports on Yorkshire’s Moors”. However, this claim is untrue; what is actually taking place is a scheduled review of fixed-term leases. Responding to our enquiries, Yorkshire Water told “Yorkshire Water says…

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1 min.
hunting festival vote fails

Peterborough council has rejected an attack on the Festival of Hunting, which takes place at the East of England Showground. The attack was led by councillor Ansar Ali, who was suspended from the Labour Party over allegations of anti-Semitism. Councillor Ali tabled a motion “to ask the leader of the council to write to the chairman of the East of England Agricultural Society to request that it does not host the Festival of Hunting at the East of England Showground in future”. The motion was seconded by a Green councillor. However, it was voted down by a total of 30 votes to 25. Even if it had been successful, the motion would have had little or no effect as the showground is independent. Peterborough resident Glen Hannaford, who has attended the festival in the…

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1 min.
controlled burn limits risk

As a warning of ‘very high’ wildfire risk is issued for much of Scotland, science from the US has endorsed the traditional use of fire to manage risk. A continued spell of dry, breezy weather meant the risk was raised to the second highest level in Easter Ross, the Central Highlands and south-west Scotland. A moderate to high warning is in place for central and western Scotland. In the US, where one of the most severe fires for decades is currently affecting the state of Oregon, scientists looked at how effective ‘prescribed burning’ was in reducing fire risk. Traditionally, areas of forest are burned under controlled conditions in order to reduce the amount of fuel available to wildfires, a process similar to that undertaken by farmers and gamekeepers on moorland in the…

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1 min.
to do this week

CONTROL Summer can be a challenging time to keep on top of grey squirrels. Abundant foliage hides them from shooting and lots of food means there is little to draw them into traps. But pheasant feeders will often draw them in. Staking them out with an air rifle or, if there is a good backstop, a .22 can help keep them in check. SHOOT With plenty of cereals now harvested, there are great opportunities for pigeon shooting on stubbles. This kind of shooting can provide ‘strategic control’ of populations to prevent future crop damage under the general licence. While hide building is a much studied art, sometimes the obvious approaches are best and straw bales can make excellent and easily assembled hides.…

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2 min.
consultation dropped after claims of ‘bias’

In a victory for shooting and farming groups, a controversial consultation on the general licences in Northern Ireland has been dropped by the government ministry that was responsible for it. The Department of Agriculture the Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) abandoned the consultation process after it came under fire for bias. The consultation had looked at proposals to remove herring gulls, both species of black-backed gulls and rooks from the 2021-22 general licences for Northern Ireland. However, countryside groups pointed out fundamental flaws with the process, including a lack of published evidence in support of the steps proposed. Those completing the consultation found they could agree with the proposed changes, but if they disagreed they had to explain why. The consultation was withdrawn suddenly and without explanation, with the web page replaced…

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